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Below is the full text of the composite motion on

first_imgBelow is the full text of the composite motion on Brexit passed by Labour conference 2018. The key pledge is that Labour vows to “support all options remaining on the table, including campaigning for a public vote” should it not be able to secure a general election.Conference welcomes Jeremy Corbyn’s determined efforts to hold the Tories to account for their disastrous negotiations. Conference accepts that the public voted to leave the EU, but when people voted to ‘take back control’ they were not voting for fewer rights, economic chaos or to risk jobs. Conference notes the warning made by Jaguar Land Rover on 11.9.18, that without the right deal in place, tens of thousands of jobs there would be put at risk.Conference notes that workers in industries across the economy in ports, food, pharmaceuticals, manufacturing, energy, chemicals, in our public services and beyond are worried about the impact of a hard Brexit on livelihoods and communities.Conference believes we need a relationship with the EU that guarantees full participation in the Single Market. The Brexit deal being pursued by Theresa May is a threat to jobs, freedom of movement, peace in Northern Ireland and the NHS. Tory Brexit means a future of dodgy trade deals and American-style deregulation, undermining our rights, freedoms and prosperity. This binds the hands of future Labour governments, making it much harder for us to deliver on our promises. Conference notes Labour has set six robust tests for the final Brexit deal. Conference believes Labour MPs must vote against any Tory deal failing to meet these tests in full.Conference also believes a no-deal Brexit should be rejected as a viable option and calls upon Labour MPs to vigorously oppose any attempt by this Government to deliver a no-deal outcome. Conference notes that when trade unions have a mandate to negotiate a deal for their members, the final deal is accepted or rejected by the membership. Conference does not believe that such important negotiations should be left to government ministers who are more concerned with self-preservation and ideology than household bills and wages.Stagnant wages, crumbling services and the housing crisis are being exacerbated by the government and employers making the rich richer at working people’s expense, and not immigration. Conference declares solidarity and common cause with all progressive and socialist forces confronting the rising tide of neo-fascism, xenophobia, nationalism and right wing populism in Europe. Conference resolves to reaffirm the Labour Party’s commitment to the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 including no hard border in Ireland.Conference believes that there is no satisfactory technological solution that is compliant with the Good Friday Agreement and resolves to oppose any Brexit deal that would see the restoration of a border on the island of Ireland in any form for goods, services or people.Should Parliament vote down a Tory Brexit deal or the talks end in no-deal, Conference believes this would constitute a loss of confidence in the Government. In these circumstances, the best outcome for the country is an immediate General Election that can sweep the Tories from power.If we cannot get a general election Labour must support all options remaining on the table, including campaigning for a public vote. If the Government is confident in negotiating a deal that working people, our economy and communities will benefit from they should not be afraid to put that deal to the public.This should be the first step in a Europe-wide struggle for levelling-up of living standards, rights and services and democratisation of European institutions Labour will form a radical government; taxing the rich to fund better public services, expanding common ownership, abolishing anti-union laws and engaging in massive public investment.Tags:Labour / Keir Starmer /Brexit /Labour conference 2018 /last_img read more

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Mayors teacher housing charter amendment crashed and burned today But perhaps that

first_imgThere was much discussion today regarding “discretionary review,” a San Francisco oddity in which private citizens can inveigh against and pillory even a conforming development. This is a legitimate cause for concern, but developers tell me it’s not near the No. 1 issue holding up their housing projects in this city. Rather, they point to spiraling construction costs and the sclerotic nature of the city’s planning bureaucracy itself. They’re less concerned with community groups holding up a project than the months or years it takes to get a hearing before the Planning Commission and connect a project with a planner.Sclerotic bureaucracy is a problem — but one the voters needn’t be involved in fixing.  So why would the mayor’s office move forward with a charter amendment everyone knew was dead on arrival? Think of it as the legislative equivalent of a flaming bag of feces placed on a mark’s doorstep. The mayor invigorated her staunchest supporters while also portraying the board as obstructionist and dysfunctional. That’s good politics. That doesn’t mean the mayor’s office isn’t legitimately trying to build more housing in other ways — but, today, the supes were made to dirty themselves by stamping out that flaming bag of feces.San Francisco’s housing crisis is just that: a crisis. Today the call went out to public speakers on both sides to provide cover for a preordained outcome. That’s politics as usual, but politics as usual got us to where we are. The charter amendment was tabled today, but the mayor and board are still both presenting competing ordinances regarding teacher housing. If teachers could live in legislation, San Francisco’s educators would be set up well. The differences between these measures are described as trivial by everyone in City Hall I’ve spoken with. Which could, in fact, lead to the most rancorous arguments of all, and competing measures being thrown to the voters come November. To wit: The definition of “affordable housing” and “teacher housing” differ depending upon whom you ask. Hopefully housing will be built. As will consensus.  Email Address Your humble narrator is not going to weigh in on the merits of the competing measures, and will focus instead on the problems and perceptions that led to today’s fraught — yet ultimately farcical — meeting. This conundrum has been framed, elsewhere, as a battle between a pro-housing mayor and an anti-housing board. Beware the distillation of a beastly complex problem into a simple slogan. Beware anyone on any side of a municipal issue evincing the moral certitude of a Crusader. Supervisor Sandra Lee Fewer’s much-repeated mantra today was “who are we leaving behind?”The misgivings the supervisors had with this proposed charter amendment when it was introduced months ago were the same ones expressed today in a telling preamble to the hearing by Supervisors Sandra Lee Fewer and Hillary Ronen. Their feelings weren’t mollified at all. In short: The mayor’s proposal would enable “by-right” teacher housing on public land in which one-third of the structure is devoted to commercial space, and, in the residential portion of the structure, one third of the units would be market-rate and open to anyone, and two-thirds would be reserved for teachers. The supes complained, however, that these teacher units would be set for residents earning up to 140 percent of area median income, with no hard and fast requirements to provide for lesser levels. Of note, 140 percent of AMI would be $121,000 for a single person and $172,400 for a family of four. What’s more, as this is a proposed charter amendment, the supes bemoaned that this setup — in which a one-bedroom apartment would run $3,000 a month — would be the new definition of “affordable.” The mayor has, repeatedly, described the above plan as “100-percent affordable teacher housing.” Which is, if nothing else, excellent branding.The competing board plan would require everyone in teacher housing to be an educator. It would also cater to those earning less money — half of the units would be for those earning 80 percent of area median income — with 20 percent of the units earmarked for educators earning 160 percent AMI. This split would, ostensibly, make these developments feasible. (Of note: This is a dicey way to fund a housing development. The mayor’s proposal of allowing one-third of the units to be market-rate housing, while politically treacherous, is not a dicey way to fund a housing development.)(Also of note: The supes’ plan relies upon structures enabled by Sen. Scott Wiener’s SB 35 — a measure many on San Francisco’s political left did not support.)As speakers in favor of the mayor’s measure pointed out today, there is less state and/or federal money to be tapped in order to provide housing for middle-income earners — and a family earning $172,000 would be hard-pressed to land property in this town. But the conflict here pits middle-income earners against lower-income earners fighting for the same resources. “Our concern is that the pie is too small. We do not want middle-income educators’ legitimate need for housing to be pitted against low-income San Franciscans,” said Ken Tray of the United Educators union. “The mayor’s office is creating a new definition of affordable housing. Fair enough. But we would’ve liked to have been there on the ground floor.”  Moments ago, a panel of supervisors scuttled a teacher housing charter amendment put forward by Mayor London Breed. This was done with no shortage of drama and acrimony and a lengthy cohort of (dramatic, acrimonious) public speakers. But, like a pro wrestling match, the outcome here was never in doubt and everyone knew the script. The mayor can count on three, maybe four votes from this board on any given day. You need six supervisors to put a charter amendment onto the ballot — and this charter amendment contained a number of provisions not amenable to the progressive majority on the board. Multiple legislators who spoke to Mission Local said they were never really engaged in a way you’d expect them to be if the object was to win their approval for passage of the charter amendment. What’s more, the unions representing the teachers — the teachers for whom this housing is proposed — did not support the mayor’s teacher housing proposal. Instead, they’re backing a competing measure put forward by members of the Board of Supervisors.  Subscribe to Mission Local’s daily newsletterlast_img read more

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SAINTS have announced their squad for Fridays Sup

first_imgSAINTS have announced their squad for Friday’s Super League XVIII Round 6 match at Warrington Wolves.As reported Gary Wheeler is set to miss the next four months with a hamstring injury – but Lance Hohaia is named in the squad.Nathan Brown will choose from:2. Ade Gardner, 3. Jordan Turner, 4. Sia Soliola, 5. Francis Meli, 6. Lance Hohaia, 7. Jonny Lomax, 9. James Roby, 10. Louie McCarthy-Scarsbrook, 11. Tony Puletua, 12. Jon Wilkin, 13. Willie Manu, 14. Anthony Laffranchi, 15. Mark Flanagan, 16. Paul Clough, 19. Josh Jones, 24. Joe Greenwood, 25. Alex Walmsley, 27. Anthony Walker. 30. Mark Percival.Tony Smith will choose his Warrington team from:1. Brett Hodgson, 2. Chris Riley, 3. Chris Bridge, 4. Ryan Atkins, 5. Joel Monaghan, 7. Richie Myler, 9. Michael Monaghan, 10. Garreth Carvell, 12. Ben Westwood, 14. Micky Higham, 15. Simon Grix, 16. Paul Wood, 17. Mike Cooper, 18. Chris Hill, 19. Stefan Ratchford, 20. Rhys Evans, 21. Tyrone McCarthy, 24. Ben Currie, 26. James Laithwaite.The game kicks off at 8pm and the referee is Richard Silverwood.Ticket details are here.last_img read more

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A DROPgoal by Josh Mantellato two minutes from th

first_imgA DROP-goal by Josh Mantellato two minutes from the end of gripping match gave Italy a shock 15-14 victory over England by the narrowest of margins, writes Liam WilliamsIt was little more than an Italy team coached by Salford-born and raised Carlo Napolitano deserved at the AJ Bell Stadium in Salford as England suffered the ultimate fate for what their coach Steve McNamara suggested was a complacent performance.A week before they open Rugby League World Cup 2013 with a match against Australia in Crdiff, England needed an intense test and that is just what they got: the Kangaroos have not played a warm-up game this weekend and can expect to come up against battle-hardened opponents with much to prove.On a rain-swept afternoon, England never got going throughout and were punished by a clinical display by Saints’ Anthony Laffranchi.Carl Ablett got England off the mark with the opening try before Sam Tomkins scored twice to give England a 14-12 half-time lead, but a second half penalty and drop-goal from Mantellato was enough for Italy to record a historic win in the first senior meeting between the two nations.England failed to get out of first gear and were punished early on by Laffranchi. The Saints forward exploited Sam Burgess’s missed tackle to squirm over the line and open the scoring for the Italians.Burgess looked like atoning for his error as he crashed over the line but was deemed to be held up. However, Ablett did get England off the mark shortly after.Ryan Hall latched on to a kick out wide and found Liam Farrell, who offloaded to Ablett to leave England within two.Italy responded well, though, and Laffranchi extended their lead, allowing Josh Mantellato to kick another two-pointer.England’s best period of the game followed as a somewhat fortuitous Tomkins slipped out of the way of a tackle to set up what should have been an easy conversion for Kevin Sinfield.However, the scrum-half hit the outside of the post to leave England trailing by four.England looked to make good use of their kicking game as Tomkins collected a kick from out wide and went over again. Gareth Widdop kicked the conversion to put England into a 14-12 half-time lead.The lead was proved not to be enough, though. Chances in the second half were few and far between, and with the ball still slippery from a first-half downpour, handling errors became increasingly common from both sides.The closest Italy came to scoring their opening try of the half was when Ben Falcone placed a grubber to the corner, however the kick was dealt with by well Josh Charnley.Hall came closest to scoring for England in the second half but it was another handling error which proved costly as his knock-on prevented what would have been a certain try.England conceded a penalty with little over 10 minutes remaining, and in an attempt to level the score, the Italians opted to go for goal. Ray Nasso duly obliged to set up a thrilling finale.The testing conditions were to prove a deciding factor as the visitors then secured a vital point after a kick deep into England’s half.Charnley, under no pressure failed to collect the ball to set Italy up with a gilt-edged chance to seal the win. Mantellato was presented with the opportunity to kick the winning drop-goal from 20 metres out in the penultimate minute.England1  Sam Tomkins (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Patricks)2  Ryan Hall (Leeds Rhinos, Oulton Raiders)3  Carl Ablett (Leeds Rhinos, Hunslet Parkside)4  Leroy Cudjoe (Huddersfield Giants, Newsome Panthers)5  Tom Briscoe (Hull FC, Featherstone Lions)6  Rangi Chase (Castleford Tigers, Dannevirke Tigers)7  Kevin Sinfield, captain (Leeds Rhinos, Waterhead)8  James Graham (Canterbury Bulldogs, Blackbrook)9  Michael McIlorum (Wigan Warriors, Queens)10  Lee Mossop (Wigan Warriors, Hensingham)11  Gareth Hock (Widnes Vikings, Wigan St Judes)12  Liam Farrell (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Patricks)13  Sam Burgess (South Sydney Rabbitohs, Dewsbury Moor)Interchange:14 Josh Charnley (Wigan Warriors, Wigan St Patricks)15 Kallum Watkins (Leeds Rhinos, Latchford Albion)16 Gareth Widdop (Melbourne Storm, King Cross)17 Rob Burrow (Leeds Rhinos, Featherstone Lions)18 George Burgess (South Sydney Rabbitohs, Dewsbury Moor)19 James Roby (St Helens, Blackbrook)20 Chris Hill (Warrington Wolves, New Spring Lions)Italy1  Anthony Minichiello (Sydney Roosters, captain)2  Josh Mantellato (Newcastle Knights)3  James Tedesco (Wests Tigers)4  Aidan Guerra (Sydney Roosters)5  James Saltonstall (Warrington Wolves)6  Ryan Ghietti (Northern Pride)7  Tim Maccan (Tweed Head Seagulls)8  Anthony Laffranchi (St Helens)9  Dean Parata (Parramatta)10  Paul Vaughan (Canberra Raiders)11  Mark Minichiello (Gold Coast Titans)12  Brenden Santi (Parramatta Eels)13  Joel Riethmuller (North Queensland Cowboys)Interchange14  Ben Falcone (South Logan)15  Gavin Hiscox (Central Coast Capras)16  Gioele Celerino (North West Roosters, Italy)17  Sam Gardel (South Logan)18  Christophe Calegari (Lezignan)19  Chris Centrino (North Sydney Bears)20  Cameron Ciraldo (Penrith Panthers)21  Fabrizio Ciaurro (Coventry Bears)22  Ray Nasso (Avignon)23  Ben Musalino (Manly Sea Eagles)24  Ryan Tramonte (Windsor Wolves)Referee: Richard Silverwood (England).last_img read more

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JON Wilkin talks about the season ahead the chall

first_imgJON Wilkin talks about the season ahead, the challenges facing the Saints and the new signings in this special extended interview.The 30-year-old excelled at scrum half last year but with the arrival of “a proper half back”, as he puts it, he will be back to his usual spot in the pack.He explains why he sacrificed his own ambitions for the good of the team and how you won’t be able to judge the new look Saints until the season is underway.Saints will kick off their Super League campaign with a trip to Warrington on Thursday February 13 before hosting Hull FC eight days later in a blockbusting Langtree Park opener.Before then Nathan Brown’s men take on Batley (January 24) and Wigan (January 31) in pre-season friendlies.To buy tickets for these matches click here or pop into the Ticket Office at Langtree Park.Mobile users can see the video here.last_img read more