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LOOK: Lakers honor Shaq with high-flying statue outside arena

first_imgPurple and gold confetti and streamers rained down on O’Neal, his family and some of the biggest names in NBA history, including Jerry West, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar and Kobe Bryant, all of whom spoke at the hour-long ceremony Friday.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSEnd of his agony? SC rules in favor of Espinosa, orders promoter heirs to pay boxing legendSPORTSBreak new groundSPORTSMcGregor blasts Cerrone in 40 seconds in UFC return ‘Bad Boys for Life’ debuts so good with box office top spot ‘It’s not my shame’: Why Filipino women are calling out sexual misconduct on social media View comments Suns’ Booker explodes for 70 points in loss to Celtics Prince Harry: ‘No other option’ but to cut royal ties ‘1917’ takes top honor at the Producers Guild Awards Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Panelo: Duterte only wants to emulate strong political will of Marcos Duterte promises to look for funds to establish rail transport in Cebucenter_img MOST READ Shaquille O’Neal poses after the unveiling of his statue in front of Staples Center, Friday, March 24, 2017, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)LOS ANGELES — The Lakers have honored Shaquille O’Neal with a bronze statue of the Hall of Fame center who helped them to three consecutive NBA titles in better days.With his youngest son pulling a gold braided cord to drop a shiny gold curtain, O’Neal laid eyes upon something bigger than the big man himself. The statue of him completing a monster dunk with his legs in the air is 9 feet (2.74m) and weighs 1,200 pounds (544kg). It is suspended 10 feet in the air, attached to the side of Staples Center. O’Neal is 7-foot-1 (2.16m) and was 325 pounds (147kg) in his playing days.ADVERTISEMENT Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next LATEST STORIES Marcos monument beside Aquino’s stirs Tarlac town Taal Volcano evacuees warned against going home Palace: Crisis over ABC-CBN franchise unlikely Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks PLAY LIST 01:40Filipinos turn Taal Volcano ash, plastic trash into bricks01:32Taal Volcano watch: Island fissures steaming, lake water receding02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respitelast_img read more

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The 24-7 LAPD

first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MORESanta Anita opens winter meet Saturday with loaded card160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! Criminals work around the clock, seven days a week. Now, the LAPD’s crime-analysis operations do, too. Last week, the Los Angeles Police Department opened its 24-7 Realtime Analysis Critical Response Division in a City Hall basement. The facility allows officers to check in at any time of the day or night for crime analysis. Using feeds from city freeway cameras, it will also be a central response point in the wake of natural disasters or major crimes. The facility was modeled after New York’s, which cost $15 million to set up. But through consolidation, the LAPD was able to do the job for a fraction of the cost. That’s good policing !ital!and!off! good management.last_img read more

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L.A. Muslim leader fooled community

first_imgNo, he isn’t. No one is trying to stifle his right to speak freely. Personally, I don’t want him silenced. I want him to say the same things to Jewish audiences that he says to Muslims and Arabs. I’d like to see one face, one real face. I am able to tolerate being disagreed with, but trust between people and groups is not built by duplicity.To get a Human Relations award, one should be turning down the rhetorical heat so that light may be seen. Words and name-calling turn up the heat and set a fire, destroying the bridges I thought we were building together.The question before us is not, as Hathout would have it, if he should he be silenced. The appropriate question is whether calling Israelis “butchers, terrorists and racist apartheid occupiers” should be honored with a human relations award.And some predicted that after 9-11 there would be no more irony.Jonathan Dobrer is a professor of comparative religion at the University of Judaism in Bel-Air. Write to him by e-mail at jdobrer@adelphia.net.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREThe joys and headaches of holiday travel: John PhillipsHe goes on to say that “the U.S. Congress is the only Israeli settlement outside of Israel.” He attributes this quotation to another source, but he uses it to bolster his argument.It gets much worse, and Hathout’s real face shatters his amiable mask of reasonableness. “Israel,” he says, “is a racist apartheid state practicing state terror.” But he demurs that he doesn’t want to criticize Israel in detail because “butchers do what butchers do.” This is exactly the kind of “collective guilt and punishment” with which critics charge Israel. Hathout also says, “The (Arab) nations that made peace with Israel will be swept away in the cesspool of history.”Hathout seems to be following the lead of Yasser Arafat, who said one nice and tolerant thing in English and then in Arabic promised eternal jihad. Unfortunately, perhaps even tragically, this once beloved spokesman for moderation now injures Muslims and Jews by undermining the faith we can have in our communications.Many good-hearted American Jews and Muslims have been meeting and talking, trying to find understanding and bridge differences. We all must wonder if this is not like lying while in couple’s therapy. How can we resolve issues if our therapeutic meetings are founded on less than truth?When the question is brought back to the question of the appropriateness of the award, Hathout claims that the issue is not whether he said Israel is a terrorist state governed by butchers. No the “real question” is one of freedom of speech. He says of the growing objections about his selection for the award: “I’m not talking about Middle East politics. I’m talking freedom of speech here.” THE scheduled presentation of a Human Relations Commission award to Dr. Maher Hathout on Oct.5 in Los Angeles has stirred up a controversy and shattered the surface calm of interfaith dialogue locally. It has pitted rabbi against rabbi and minister against priest. Ironically, this prestigious award for promoting good human relations has turned into a melee.For years, Hathout has been the friendly face of Islam in Southern California. This now seems to be a false face. Tapes and writings have revealed that Hathout has spoken in the kind of heated rhetoric – against Israel and Jews – that does not promote good relations among local humans.As senior advisor to the Muslim Public Affairs Council, Hathout has participated in many interfaith dialogues and spoken cordially to Jewish groups. I have enjoyed meeting and speaking with him on numerous occasions. I have also moderated interfaith dialogues in which he participated at the University of Judaism. He portrayed himself as a moderate, someone with a point of view but without hate. He projected calming assurances of tolerance.Thus, I feel a sense of personal betrayal. This man, who has sat next to me and spoken of how Muslims were misunderstood and badly portrayed in U.S. media — which I thought at the time was a fair point — now places his complaint in context by explaining that “the U.S. is under Israeli occupation.” This is pretty much the touchstone of anti-Semitism: Israel controls American Jews, and together we run the government and the media.last_img read more

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SATURDAY SIX SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: A Behind-the-Scenes Look at Theme Park FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

first_imgStep 2 (if needed): If there is something extra interesting about the food, take a second photo to highlight it.Most breakfast sandwiches do not have an egg in the shape of a hockey puck or bacon and cheese melted in a way that reminds someone of a creature from John Carpenter’s The Thing). So that deserves an extra picture. VERY IMPORTANT! After a certain amount of time, photographing Disney plush will drive a theme park food photographer insane. Plush photography time must be limited. Chip & Dale Ufufys with shots of Cuervo Gold tequila. An untrained theme park food photographer may have tried to take this photo with only one shot of tequila THAT WOULDN’T MAKE SENSE. Always think of “story” when at a photo shoot.A non-trained photographer would attempt this shot with just one shot of Tequila, but that would make no sense story wise. Chip & Dale would never split a shot! (photo by Brandon Glover) Now we finally have a photo that can be featured in a theme park article.Rainbow Sherbert Glitter Dream Ale. (photo by Capt Cruiseline) Take for example this wonderful shot of food taken at Flower & Garden Festival. Sitting on a railing, the contrast between the food and the gorgeous flowers behind it leads to a wonderful shot.(photo by Blog Mickey)However, mere milliseconds after the photo was taken, the photography gods took a sacrifice. A theme park food photographer’s biggest enemy is their own hubris (and diabetes).(photo by Blog Mickey)# 4 – The Appropriate Use of Plush at the TableMany “normal” people think nothing of the hours of preparation a theme park food photographer spends when deciding which Disney plush to bring to a restaurant shoot. There are so many complex variables involved that it takes a super genius like Neil deGrasse Tyson (or that guy from The Hangover) in order to figure it out. That’s the type of brain power a theme park food photographer needs to have.There is a strict caste system when it comes to which plush is appropriate when photographing theme park-related food and drinks. For example, Duffy the Disney Bear is a definite no-no. Too pedestrian. A theme park food photographer needs to have an air of sophistication around them at all times. That’s why it’s okay to have friends of Duffy the Bear, such as, ‘Olu the turtle from Aulani, or Tippy Blue the seagull and Gelatoni the cat from Tokyo Disneyland. Attraction plush such as Albert the monkey from Mystic Manor or Chandu the tiger from Sindbad’s Storybook Voyage are also recommended. Having these type characters at the table show everyone right up front you mean business.Certain Tsum Tsums are allowed, and you are encouraged to theme the Tsum to the various locale. Bring a Remy the rat Tsum to Chefs de France, Lumiere the candle Tsum at Be Our Guest Restaurant, or Cruella de Vil at the Electric Umbrella. All Ufufys are acceptable because most Disney fans have never seen them and that makes them appear even more exotic. People like “forbidden fruit” and they have no idea that you got Ufufys at Buy One/Get Two Free on ShopDisney.com. It’s a win-win situation!As two intrepid theme park food photographers take glamour shots of a Maximus Tsum Tsum, a bewildered guest in the background seemingly questions their sanity. John Q Public has no idea of the blood, sweat, and tears that goes into every Disney food photo shoot.All worth it. (photo by Hunter Underwood)Chef Remy Tsum Tsum correctly pictured enjoying the France Pavilion offerings of EPCOT’s Festival of the Arts. (photo by @FiBelleFi)Chandu the tiger paints a cookie. This is a perfect example of the level of dedication that is expected by the craft of theme park food photography itself. Anything less? GTFO. (photo by @FiBelleFi)It’s important that you never treat the plush at the table like a prop and instead understand that it’s a member of the dining party. Once a theme park food photographer understands that, it’s game on.Not just a Gelatoni plush, but a Gelatoni-From-Aulani plush. When you want to be serious about theme park photography, that’s where you START. (photo by Brandon Glover)Stitch Ufufy “drinking” a moonshine. (photo by Brandon Glover) # 2 – Above All, a Theme Park Food Photographer is Cheap Frugal (AKA, if you absolutely have to spend money, bring along extra photographers to split the cost)As a theme park food photographer, going to a restaurant alone is a rookie mistake. The more photographers you have, the more times the bill can be split.To see how theme park photography can affect the bottom line, let’s give an example. First we have master photographer Travis Terrell. First of all, kudos for Travis for using an appropriately sized lens for photographing No Melt Ice Cream in the Wizarding World. However, Travis went by himself. So this $4.99 snack cost him – with tax (thanks Obama) – over $5 out of pocket. Share This!This week’s SATURDAY SIX takes a behind-the-scenes look at the seedy world of THEME PARK FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY! Yes, we all enjoy the frivolity of reading about our favorite attractions, shows, and hotels at Walt Disney World, but there are times we need some hard-hitting journalism. The SAT 6 investigative team has won various awards for deep dives on subjects including Disney Pet Peeves and the Worst Places to Propose at WDW, but this week we are venturing into a world that is virtually a theme park secret society. A group of dedicated men and women who put their lives on the line to get the one thing we all desperately need: pictures of theme park food.Few understand the sacrifice your average theme park food photographer has given to the community. The theme park food photographers don’t do it for the fame or the accolades, and they certainly don’t do it for the money. They do it for the honor. They do it for the opportunity to give back. And sometimes they do it for likes on Instagram.Prepare yourself for a look into a world that exists right below the surface. A world which has a rigid set of rules in which even the most minor of infractions can bring swift and painful punishment. Allow us to introduce to you, the world of theme park food photography…# 6 – A Theme Park Photographer’s Best Friend is a TRASH CAN (in fact many times it’s their only friend)Readers of this fine blog series probably know the oft-told story that it was Walt Disney himself who wanted garbage cans placed within every 27 feet of each other inside the parks. While the conventional wisdom dictates that the cans were to encourage guests from littering, Disney Historians now say the garbage cans are proof that Walt always foresaw a Food & Wine Festival at the parks and realized he needed more tables for capacity. Whatever the reason for their existence, over the years these garbage cans have become as important to a theme park food photographer as the camera itself!You couldn’t ask for a better item to store food on. Thanks Walt! (photo by @Blog_Mickey)A simple trash can, which may seem mundane and trivial to the average theme park guest became a wonderful canvas for the food photographer to work their magic on.Ace photographer Brandon Glover at the Magic Kingdom.A Rose Gold cupcake has never looked so beautiful! (photo by Brandon Glover)Brandon Glover uses a nasty garbage can in Adventureland to take a picture of the Dole-Whip Topped Pineapple Upside Down Cake.Indescribably beautiful! (photo by Brandon Glover)A garbage can shot with a garbage can as a background. The rare garbage can INCEPTION. (photo by @blog_mickey) Step 3: Throw away the food. Write blog post.That’s it. You’re now an official theme park food blogger.“Bye Bye Bye!” – *NSYNCLet’s go through the process again, except this this time with a “Belle” cupcake that only needs one photo.Belle Cupcake. (photo by @viewsandqueues)So there you have it: A Behind-The-Scenes Look at Theme Park Food Photography! See you next weekend for the latest installment of the SATURDAY SIX, where we’ll look at something fun from the world of Disney and Universal. If you enjoyed yourself, be sure to check out The Magic, The Memories, and Merch! articles, or, for your listening pleasure, check out the E-Ticket Report podcast. You can also follow Your Humble Author on Twitter (@derekburgan).If you enjoyed this article, you will surely like the following:6 Pieces of Disney Merchandise That Don’t Exists (But Totally Should)Are Disney’s Hotels Going To The Dogs? A Review.Walt Disney World Locations Used in Hulk Hogan’s THUNDER IN PARADISESATURDAY SIX Investigative Report: Disney PET PEEVESThe 5th Annual Theme Park TURKEYS of the Year6 Reasons We’ll NEVER FORGET 2018 (No Matter How Hard We Try!)Special Thanks to The Elite Brandon Glover, Captain Cruiseline Scott Sanders of the world famous Disney Cruise Line Blog, Mrs. Captain Cruiseline Emily Sanders, a man with a true eye behind the lens @ViewsAndQueues, DisTwitter meme machine @SuperWeenieHtJr, my personal protege Hunter “Elvey” Underwood, the bio-est of all reconstructs @bioreconstruct, Mr. ‘Ohana Tim Grassey, the man who took down DISFLIX @Schmoofy, the Joker of DisTwitter (AKA the one who just wants to see the whole world burn) Josh EasyWDW, Ufufy and Tsum Queen @FiBelleFi, the SAT SIX Fun Squad of Parkscope Joe and Nick, Disney Photography ICON Tom Bricker (and Sarah Bricker), the lovely lady of theme park merchandise Blog Minnie, and Hermione Granger’s tutor Megan Stump for their invaluable assistance with this article. The SAT SIX is inspired each week by goofballs Aengus Mackenzie and LitemAndHyde and you Potterheads will  enjoy Meg’s other blog work over at the Central Florida Slug Club.An extra special thanks to Blog Mickey for, well, he knows what.FINAL PLUG! Did you know The 2019 Unofficial Guide to Universal Orlando has a special edition of the SATURDAY SIX in it?That’s right, ANOTHER NEW ONE EXCLUSIVE TO THIS EDITION!Finally, someone came up with an actual reason to read a book. ORDER this baby now!Becky Ashley taking photos of runDisney medals, as one does. (photo by Jamie Boedecker) # 3 – A Theme Park Food Photographer Must Be Creative and in PEAK PHYSICAL CONDITION (because you never know what it will take to get your shot)While movie fans have heard stories of Tom Cruise doing his own stunts for the Mission: Impossible films, what many don’t realize is that for six weeks before every M:I, Cruise shadows various theme park food photographers – including Tom Bricker, Scott Sanders, and Blog Mickey –  to get his body in the extreme physical shape that those stunts demand. To get the shots we all take for granted, oftentimes theme park photographers have to contort their body into more positions than a Cirque du Soleil performer. These photographers end up popping Percocet and OxyContin like they are Skittles, but they have no regrets because you, Dear Reader, are worth it.Ace photographer Brandon Glover places a chair on top of a ping pong table to get his shot.Bam! (photo by Brandon Glover) You don’t have to have Abs Of Steel to be a theme park food photographer, but it helps!Bam! (photo by Brandon Glover)Imagine staying in this position for 35 minutes just to get the perfect shot. Quads BURNING. Is it worth it?Answer: A resounding YES. (photo by Brandon Glover)Corollary to # 3: A theme park food photographer has to have NERVES OF STEEL. They must be able to concentrate under the most absurd of conditions.The actions of a theme park food photographer may be questionable to the untrained eye, but that’s only because they are working on a level very few humans can comprehend. They may get weird looks. They may even get snide comments. Regardless, a theme park photographer must ignore everything around them with the knowledge that – in the end – they will be proven right once again.Imagine seeing THIS while walking through Universal CityWalk. (photo by @Caitlizgrace)Nailed it. (photo by Hunter Underwood)“Nothing to see here. Keep moving on.” (photo by @Cheeksadam)Captain Cruiseline prepares for a shot. (photo by Emily Sanders and @SuperweenieHtJr)E-Ticket Pinord La Dama Reserva Familiar Brut from the France Pavilion in EPCOT. (photo by Captain Cruiseline) Sometimes a good theme park food photographer needs to “peacock” a little and strut their stuff. This is best accomplished by taking Disney plush to the Universal Orlando Resort. Universal may be printing money by selling Harry Potter wands and Thing 1/Thing 2 t-shirts, but they have yet to make a plush recognizable enough to bring to a food photo shoot. By bringing exclusive Disney plush over to “the dark side,” you’re doing your part to class that joint up.‘Olu at Universal’s Voodoo Doughnut. (photo by Hunter Underwood) HONORABLE MENTION – You can judge how good a food photographer is by how hot the meal is. The colder the food, the better the photographerIf you happen to be out with a theme park food photographer and you enjoy a nice hot meal, guess what, the photographer you’re with is horrible at their job. Like a Hollywood movie, all good theme park food photographers need to get “coverage.” Pictures must be taken from various angles, with different backgrounds, and with whatever prop is needed to make the photo the absolute best it can be. In between photos, the better theme park food photographers will also be posting live updates to social media platforms. To quote @Blog_Mickey, “You can’t eat it, ’till you tweet it.” Words to live by.No, we’re not done yet! Some artists work on canvas while others chisel out of stone but a theme park photography creates his masterpiece out of theme park food AND IT TAKES TIME! (photo by Hunter Underwood) # 5 – When Not Using a Trash Can, a Theme Park Food Photographer Has To Think Outside the Box (and risk the consequences)There are occasions when a trash can is unavailable, generally because it is being used as a two-top for guests eating at whatever festival is currently going on at EPCOT. In these instances, the theme park food photographer has to be creative and figure out another way to get their shot.Captain Cruiseline Scott Sanders takes a picture of Masu Sake (served in a box) at EPCOT’s Japan Pavilion.Voilà! Magic has been created in front of your eyes. (photo by Captain Cruiseline Scott Sanders) Now, let’s try a similar priced dessert with two world class photographers. The price of this Yin & Yang Oreo Mousse Cake is $6. Split between two it comes to $3 per person. Good, but not great…center_img # 1 – Proper Table Etiquette for Guests Dining WITHOUT a CameraThey say for children the rule is to “be seen and not heard.” A similar rule exists for guests at a table without a camera, except it’s “you should not be seen or heard.” A theme park photographer’s focus needs to be on the food or drink in front of them, and they can’t be distracted by idle chit chat or questions like “are you done yet?”If you happen to be at a table with a theme park photographer it is very vital to remember that THE CAMERA ALWAYS EATS FIRST.Always.Let’s go over some examples. When food or drinks are delivered to your table it is a natural human instinct to grab them. It’s been a long day at the parks, you’re starving, and that food looks so good…(photo by Hunter Underwood) DOUBLE SECRET HONORABLE MENTION – When Reviewing Theme Park Food, Pictures Are All That Matter…TASTE IS IRRELEVANT.In fact, eating the food may actually bias you. A theme park food photographer knows that a picture is worth a thousand words, so when getting home and writing the review, they know that photos can do the talking.Here’s an example of theme park food photography in 3 simple steps.STEP 1: Take an overall picture of the food.Pop-Tart Sandwich. Let’s check out another pair to show the WRONG way. Look at them grabbing the food and wine like their animals. Even smelling something is risking an essence of the food or drink being lost before the camera can capture it. DO NOT DEPRIVE THE READERS OF THEIR RICHES.(photo by Brandon Glover) Let’s try this again. Looks like this one is also WRONG. Any idea why? We’ll tell you why below.(photo by Brandon Glover)THERE IS NO SMILING IN THEME PARK FOOD PHOTOGRAPHY.This is not “fun.” We’re not here to have a good time. We’re here to work! The readers deserve our very best, and we can only give them that when we FOCUS. Want to smile? Go have a meal at some unbloggable place like Chuck E Cheese. When you’re ready to truly be all you can be, then you join us in the high stakes kill-or-be-killed world of theme park food photography. Let’s try one more at the parks. Look at this guy. Gets a Rainbow Sherbert Glitter Dream Ale at the Festival of the Arts and has the audacity to hold it up for all the world to see. Who does he think he is?! By now you should know this is absolutely WRONG!!(photo by Emily Sanders) THIS is the right way. You stand there and wait! A theme park food photographer doesn’t work around your time, they work around the best picture’s time.(photo by Emily Sanders) Other times a new drink will debut at Walt Disney World and the “bloggers” will swarm on it like locusts. BREAKING: readers have to see the same boring shot a thousand times until a theme park food photographer steps in to add some flair.Captain Cruiseline always looking for originality. (photo by Emily Sanders)You’ve seen this drink photographed many times by “bloggers” but none of them with the creativity and panache of a theme park food photographer. Show us a better photo of a glass of Barrymore Rose, we’ll wait… (photo by Scott Sanders) Here’s the best part, that ONE skillet cookie can now be featured in multiple blogs and the readers will be none the wiser! The food photographers just coordinate who is going to use “FIRST LOOK,” “BREAKING,” “EXCLUSIVE REVIEW”, and so forth.Skillet Cookie at House of Blues. (photo by Brandon Glover)Skillet Cookie at House of Blues. (photo by the undisputed King of Counter Service, Josh EasyWDW)Skillet Cookie at House of Blues. (photo by Hunter Underwood)Skillet Cookie at House of Blues. (Photo by Tom Bricker during one of his rare days not in Kyoto, Japan)Corollary to # 2:  If a theme park photographer has to pay a check, they are always prepared with DISCOUNT CARDSA theme park photographers wallet – an item which should be opened as little as possible – must contain the following items: WDW Annual Pass, Universal Orlando Annual Pass, SeaWorld Annual Pass, Chase Disney Visa, Chase Disney Visa Rewards, Disney Gift Card (preferably purchased at Target), Tables in Wonderland, Universal Dining Plan card, and LEGO VIP. Before heading out, a thrifty theme park photographer heads into the purse or wallet of their parents (or grandparents) to grab that AAA, Diner’s Club, or DVC ownership card. The ultimate goal is the confuse the server to the point of stacking discounts.(photo by Hunter Underwood) Okay, time for a master class on the subject. Here’s a picture of theme park food photography royalty in action. They are photographing a skillet cookie from House of Blues in Disney Springs. At $9, the cookie is much more expensive than the No Melt Ice Cream. However that $9 is being split by 5 photographers, bringing the per photographer cost down to under $2 each!No need for a 360 camera when you have food photography professionals in the house! COROLLARY TO # 1 – A guest without a camera MUST serve the theme park photographer’s wants and needs, WITHOUT QUESTIONThe duties of guests without a camera may include the following: being a lighting fixture, blocking other guests from ruining the shot, and giving constant encouragement to the photographer.(photo by @caitlizgrace and @SuperweenieHtJr) The correct procedure for those dining without a camera is to sit with your arms straight to your side, look straight ahead, and keep your mouth shut. This allows the theme park food photographer – a modern day Renaissance artist if there ever was one – to concentrate and deliver the pictures that the reading audience deserves. If the food gets cold, that’s what we call collateral damage.(photo by Hunter Underwood) Balancing a drink on a themed fence takes practice…and courage (photo by Emily Sanders)But in the end, it’s worth it. Every time. (photo by Scott Sanders)When looking for appropriate places to display food or drink, a theme park food photographer has be fully aware of the environment around them, lest disaster occur.You must have GUTS to be a theme park food photographer. Getting the sake box to sit perfectly on this particular post would take the balancing skill of a Jenga black belt. (photo by Emily Sanders)last_img read more

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7 Useful Tips for Managing Your Remote Team [Infographic]

first_imgA web designer is updating the style guide in Tampa, Florida, while a developer codes new search features in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. A content specialist in Traverse City, Michigan crafts the words describing benefits of the new product that will be released next month.Sounds like a typical day in the life of a web professional, doesn’t it? Would you believe they’re all members of the same team working on the same project? In the web industry, it’s common to find team members working remotely around the country, even around the world as Automattic employees do.And as a manager of a remote team, you know how critical it is to have aWork planEffective communicationClear goals and objectivesWhat else can you do to successfully manage your virtual team? My friend Chris Wiegman, Web Developer at the University of Florida, has worked remotely for three years. I asked him what he appreciated most from his manager. He replied, The most important quality a remote manager must have is the ability to trust.When you can’t see your team members, it takes a level of trust many aren’t capable of to make it work.In their infographic, NutCache shares seven useful tips for managing your virtual team from hiring the right team members who can work independently and together to using the right remote work tools. Learn how you can better manage your remote team in this infographic, or if you prefer, read the text version.7 Tips for Managing Your Remote TeamWorkforce: Hire the right people.Not everyone is up to the task of working alone, as remote workplaces are usually less social than co-located ones. People on remote teams need to be ok with that. For best results, it’s imperative to hire people who are up for this challenge and capable of working independently, but yet in a small team.Tools: Use the right remote work tools.Tools are important in a remote workplace because they enable you to better organize the team and keep everyone on the same page. A truly effective remote work team will have all of the vital remote work tools: EmailFile sharing capacityAn instant messaging platformScreen sharing softwareProject management software, andAny tools or resources specific to your industry Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading…RelatedTroubleshooting Remotely Is a Lot Easier with Support DetailsI belong to an online community of designers and developers where we chat about our web projects, ask questions, share web design ideas, and help and support each other. It’s a great community of people, with different strengths, skills, and experiences to share. Earlier this month one of the members…In “Internet”Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development Resources: June 13, 2014Welcome to the weekly roundup! Each week I gather resources for user experience, accessibility, WordPress, CSS, HTML and responsive design and compile it in my weekly resource post. In this week’s post, you’ll learn about a great collection on online user experience tools, find out what the future is for…In “Web design & development links”June 23, 2013: Weekly Roundup of Web Design and Development ResourcesEvery week I post a roundup of new web development and design resources I’ve learned about from the blogs I read and the people I follow on Twitter. This week’s roundup of resources highlights the recent W3C draft of the CSS Shapes Module, presentation and notes from last week’s UX…In “Web design & development links” ProcessOrganize a work plan.One of the most important ingredients in a powerful remote team is process, or how you work. In a virtual team, each person may develop their own processes and procedures that don’t mesh with the way other team members are working. It’s best to use a project management system to keep everyone in touch.Goals: Articulate project goals and objectives clearly.Help remote workers understand what they are working towards by setting the correct priorities and goals. In a virtual work setting, the importance of having clear project goals and objectives cannot be overstated. These goals should be clearly communicated during meetings, regular check-ins, and performance reviews, too.Communication: Keep communication lines open.Communication is key when you have a completely remote workforce. You have to get really good at deliberate, structured communication, making sure the team is checking in daily. Set aside time for your one on ones with your remote employees. Also, encouraging team members to keep in touch with each other can be invaluable for additional points of communication. Effective communication will help you build a team that is innovative, efficient, and results-driven.Trust: Trust is key.Recruiting remote workers you can trust can be a time-consuming process when you’re trying to run a business. And since not everyone can work in a remote environment, it’s important to find people you can trust to complete their tasks, and stay productive when working under their own steam. Hire doers, people you know they will get stuff done.Team building: Develop a happy and engaged team.Compensate for the fact that you are not bumping into each other by trying to create some social aspects with a remote team. Creating stronger bonds within your company can be as simple as Using videos as a way to inspire your teamMeeting in person periodicallyHaving and maintaining non-work related communication, orAnything that creates a feeling that teamworkers are not working separately but are truly part of a team.last_img read more

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LATAM boosts links between Chile and Brazil

first_imgImage: LATAM South America’s LATAM is boosting connections between Chile and Brazil with a new service to Brasilia that reduces travel time from Santiago by four hours.The new route between the two capitals is operated by an all-economy 174-seat Airbus A320 and, along with a new Santiago-Curriba route due to launch March 2020, will bring the number of direct routes between the two countries to five.Brasilia is LATAM’s second-biggest operational base in Brazil with connections to 23 destinations including Manaus, Fortaleza, Maceió, Recife and Salvador.READ: Delta sees passenger benefits from 20 percent stake in LATAM.“This new route reaffirms our commitment to offering the best network of destinations and flights in Latin America,’’ said LATAM group commercial director David Arcos.“These flights not only offer better connections to Brasilia, the political center of Brazil, but guests can also connect more easily to the multitude of destinations in the north and northeast of Brazil,”Other LATAM ports in Brazil are Porto Alegre, Rio de Janeiro and its hub from São Paulo where it offers connections to 30 destinations within Brazil and 26 international destinations in South America, United States, Europe, Asia and Africa.The Santiago-Brasilia flight (LA870)  will depart on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 1:55 PM (local time) from Santiago’s Arturo Merino Benitez Airport, arriving in Brasilia at 6:15 PM (local time).The return flight (LA781) will operate on the same days and will depart from the Presidente Juscelino Kubitschek International Airport in Brasilia at 8:05 PM (local time), arriving in Santiago at 00:25 AM (local time).The expansion comes as LATAM launches three-times-weekly non-stop flights from Sydney to Santiago from October 27.LATAM has been flying to Chile from Sydney via Auckland until now and will continue to do so four days a week.However, the airline’s Boeing 787-9s will wing their way non-stop to Santiago from Sydney on Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays and from Santiago to Sydney on Wednesdays, Fridays and Sundays.last_img read more

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Guardians of the Golden Arches: The McDonald’s U.S. Security and Loss Prevention Program

first_imgWhile loss prevention may be a universal focus for retail organizations, the way that the loss prevention program is approached and implemented can provide us wide a wide spectrum of possibilities and a broad scope of challenges based on the particular type of organization. Here we will take a closer look at the security and loss prevention program for an icon in the quick service restaurant industry.McDonald’s™. The name is instantly recognizable, conjuring up images of Big Mac™ sandwiches, Chicken McNuggets™, and World Famous Fries™. No matter where your travels take you across the globe, chances are you will find a McDonald’s, and chances are the hamburger you purchase in Doha, Qatar, will taste and look identical to the one you purchase in Peoria, Illinois.McDonald’s is the juggernaut of quick service, the restaurant chain that eclipses its competition by an order of magnitude. Think your retail chain is pretty big? McDonald’s gets 27 million visitors per day, and that’s in the United States alone.- Sponsor – From a retail security and loss prevention program perspective, one can imagine not only the types of incidents that can occur at your average McDonald’s location, but the sheer number of them as well. To understand why this might be, just consider what goes on at the nearly 15,000 McDonald’s restaurants scattered throughout the United States through the dual mechanisms of lobby dining and drive-through service.At the end of the day, it is truly remarkable that such a small team is so effective in protecting what just might be the most identifiable brand across the globe. It ultimately comes down to the attitude of retail security pervasiveness throughout the organization, as Senior Director Rob Holm puts it, “from the boardroom to the crew room.”The local McDonald’s is often much more than a spot to buy food; it’s a well-known landmark in whatever city it happens to be in. The Golden Arches™ are often occupied by people seeking a place for morning meetings or parents enjoying time with their children over a Happy Meal™ in the Playplace restaurants.For a demographics comparison, this author also visited several Southern California McDonald’s restaurants during the writing of this article. The drive-through lanes are occupied with everything from Bentleys to barely running jalopies. Translation—when asked who their demographic is, McDonaldÕs can confidently and with a straight-faced answer, “Everyone.”When considering all of the circumstances that can and do occur at your average McDonald’s, one starts to form a picture of the lay of the land when it comes to loss prevention programs and security protection nationwide. To that end, McDonald’s possesses one of the most unconventional, yet effective, loss prevention teams in the business. They call themselves U.S. Security, which sounds as if it is some flavor of Special Forces SWAT team or other such covert group. And yes, they really are everywhere.McDonald’s U.S. Security TeamMcDonald’s may be mainstream today, and its modus operandi might seem fairly conventional, but when the company founder Ray Kroc stumbled upon the McDonald brothers in the 1950s, he knew he had something special. It wasn’t so much the food (barbeque) or the location (sleepy San Bernardino, California), it was the whole package. Implementing a Ford-style food assembly line that produced burgers ultra-fast, McDonald’s became an instant hit, expanding like no other business before it, and to be honest, probably any business that comes after it.Robert “Rob” Holm, Senior DirectorKevin Trimble, DirectorOctavio Jara, DirectorOsama “Sam” Ayache, Regional Security ManagerWilliam “Bill” Ball, Regional Security ManagerDon Carman, Regional Security Manager U.S. Security takes the uniqueness of principle that is McDonald’s and forges its own path in the loss prevention space. The result is a retail security organization that resembles exactly no other loss prevention program in the business. To be clear, U.S. Security seldom uses the term “loss prevention,” nor do they embrace the other industry alternative “asset protection,” either. Instead, they prefer to use the “security” moniker, although physical security is only a small part of what they actually do. And guess what—they do a stellar job with far fewer people than one might think possible.Hugo Cortez, Regional Security ManagerRuben Martinez, Regional Security ManagerJesse Perez, Regional Security ManagerJennifer Schaefer, Regional Security ManagerDaniel Thomas, Regional Security ManagerJohnny Webb, Regional Security ManagerU.S. Security boasts a fairly simple organizational chart considering the behemoth size of McDonald’s. It is headed up by Senior Director Robert “Rob” Holm, who is the executive in charge of all U.S. safety and security efforts. From there and specific to the security function, the country is split into four zones—South and Northeast headed by Director Kevin Trimble; Central and West headed by Director Octavio Jara. The zones are broken down into regions with ten regional security managers (RSM) assigned to one or more regions. If you’ve been keeping count thus far, you’ve arrived at a grand total of thirteen individuals. Really? Certainly there must be some sort of accounting error.Before wrapping your head around these statistics, it’s important to understand the business model that McDonald’s uses to operate. McDonald’s restaurants are comprised of two distinct types of restaurant. First, there are the company-owned restaurants, internally referred to as McOpCo restaurants, which is short for “McDonald’s-operated company” restaurants. Of the approximate 15,000 U.S. restaurants, roughly 10 percent are McOpCo restaurants, and they are the rudder of the ship, as it were.According to Holm, “There are three reasons why McOpCo restaurants exist. First, to provide revenue for the corporation. Second, they are a petri dish, a place to vet new technologies and try things. And third, which is the most important reason they exist, they are a people pump. They train and develop future leaders for both inside and outside the restaurants.”This takes us to the bulk of McDonald’s restaurants—the restaurants run by independent franchisees (“owner operators”). Owner-operator restaurants comprise the vast majority of the McDonald’s empire, and while the owner operators themselves must adhere to the terms and conditions of a franchise agreement, the individual restaurants are run in such a manner that the owner operators make their own financial decisions and run their businesses as they see fit. Of course, this sometimes presents a challenge to the U.S. Security staff, but more on that later.To the thousands of franchisees across the nation, U.S. Security can take on a number of roles when supporting an owner operator. Depending on the situation, that role could include a security professional resource, a trusted advisor, or a strategic business consultant, with the goal of helping them address all manner of loss prevention issues.Boots on the GroundWhere the rubber meets the road at U.S. Security, you’ll find ten high-speed regional security managers, each responsible for providing expert security advice to hundreds of restaurants in their respective geographical regions. Most of them come from conventional retail loss prevention programs, while others do not.Take Jennifer Schaefer for example, a RSM in the Midwest and Heartland region of the country comprising approximately 1,200 restaurants. Schaefer boasts a master’s degree in criminal justice leadership. Prior to coming to McDonald’s, Schaefer worked for such retail and gourmet coffee and food establishments as Target and Caribou Coffee Company. She also has significant experience as a judicial law clerk, correctional officer, and college professor, which gives her a wide plethora of experience to apply in the multi-faceted LP industry and QSR system.William “Bill” Ball is another RSM in the Midwest territory (Ohio and Indiana) and serves as the go-to security professional for approximately 1,300 restaurants. “I started my loss prevention career chasing shoplifters at Sears for $5.45 per hour,” stated Ball, who later worked for Kohl’s, The Gap, and then Lowe’s, before beginning his career at McDonald’s.Daniel Thomas, however, holds a somewhat different background. He currently serves as RSM for the Michigan and Chicago area regions, comprised of nearly 1,400 restaurants. Thomas came to McDonald’s eighteen years ago after serving as a police officer. “I spent ten years as a patrolman and detective with the St. Louis Police Department,” he stated.The regional security managers hold an eclectic mix of talents and former avocations to be sure, but this diversity is what makes U.S. Security so effective. Octavio Jara, director of U.S. security for the Western U.S., was also a former police officer in his past life in Southern California before working as a member of the loss prevention program at AutoZone.Senior Director Holm is a career security executive, having held similar positions at Honeywell, 3M, Imation, and the Tribune Company, among others. With such a small staff compared to similarly sized retail establishments, there are no novices, no trainees, and no second-rate people within U.S. Security. Each position is filled by a seasoned pro. What is interesting about U.S. Security as a whole is the corporate mantra that pervades the organization, which was summed up best by Holm when he said, “I’m not a loss prevention professional. I am a business professional who has expertise in the security field.” Thomas echoed that sentiment with a slight twist. “I see myself as a strategic business partner. If the restaurants only use me for security issues, they are missing out,” stated Thomas.What Could Possibly Go WrongBefore delving into U.S. Security’s methodology, consider the range of incidents that can take place at your average McDonald’s. Some of these are germane to other retail establishments, while others are particular to McDonald’s, mainly because of the massive foot traffic within the restaurants on a daily basis.“Over the course of a single week,” began Schaefer, “I was asked to consult on two missing deposit investigations, a credit card skimming incident, a multi-restaurant demonstration, and one private plane that crash landed in the parking lot.” Other, unique events are common as well, due to the sheer ubiquity of the chain.“I recently had someone call a restaurant claiming there was an explosive device under one of the chairs, and it turned out to be a high-profile media event,” said Thomas. “Thankfully, no explosive device was found.”Holm has perhaps the best explanation for the wide diversity of potential issues that may arise nationwide. “Twenty-seven million people per day visit McDonald’s restaurants. If you tell me there is a one-in-a-million chance that something will happen in our restaurants, then it will happen 27 times per day,” explained Holm.Accordingly, the regional security managers are no strangers to calls at all hours of the day and night. “When I get a call in the middle of the night, my first question…is everyone okay? It is all about our number one priority—our people,” emphasized Schaefer.With each regional security manager in charge of the loss prevention needs of several hundred restaurants each, how does US Security manage to execute their responsibilities at such a high level? “We are a one-man or one-woman show in the regions we support,” said Bill Ball. “Our primary responsibility is brand protection, which includes protecting our employees and customers, our corporate assets, and our strategic partners, all with the goal of providing the best restaurant experience for our customers.”Spend enough time with the regional security managers, and you will hear the term “brand protection” mentioned a lot. It is not just a catchy buzzword that McDonald’s has adopted. It is in fact an actual detailed strategy with dozens of implications. To U.S. Security, brand protection is a multi-faceted strategy. “We have to protect the brand from different things—robberies, homicides, and burglaries,” said Ball.Jara wholeheartedly agrees, yet adds further items to the laundry list. “Protecting the brand includes protection of confidential information, our reputation, our most valuable resources, our employees, and of course, our customers,” he stated.A Two-Pronged ApproachEach RSM has to deal with the two distinct retail environments—McOpCo locations and franchisee restaurants—both of which have their own separate and unique needs. Said Ball, “We have to fly at a much higher level. We have to stay cognizant of resources and time. We have to handle things by phone, which includes coaching and investigations.” Although occasionally, as Thomas pointed out, “Sensitive issues require boots on the ground, and you need to get into a restaurant.”What makes U.S. Security’s job such a challenge is the inherent dichotomy between the McOpCo restaurants and the franchisee restaurants. On the one hand, LP needs within the McOpCo restaurants function much like any corporate loss prevention program. In those restaurants U.S. Security enjoys a tabula rasa approach at loss prevention activities. Things like camera systems, safes, lighting, alarm systems, and exception-reporting software can all be purchased as a whole and then rolled out to each location much as would happen in any other corporation. In this environment, McDonald’s U.S. Security team is free to test new technologies and practices, which can then be offered as solutions to the owner operators. In McOpCo restaurants, these new methods and procedures are thoroughly vetted, so by the time they are offered to owner-operator restaurants, US Security knows they are proven solutions.Don’t think, however, that U.S. Security merely issues an edict or proclamation and then leaves it to the owner operators to follow. That’s really not how it works. “We are here as a resource for best practices. In the end, it is their restaurant, their time, their employee base,” said Schaefer.Ball expanded upon that thought. “McOpCo restaurants are the test beds, the restaurants that we do all these things in to show what works,” he explained. “Then the franchisees can see that it works and determine whether or not to adopt those methods within their restaurants as they see fit.”When called upon by owner operators, the RSMs can serve as valuable resources and consultants for the loss prevention program. Said Thomas, “We try to walk in their stores from a loss prevention standpoint and determine which LP methods might be effective from a security and cost standpoint and which might be less so.”In many cases, the adoption of new technologies or methods involves a large degree of consulting and influence with the owner operator. “It’s all about building those relationships,” stated Ball. “It’s your subject-matter expertise that you have to convey to the operators. You have to show them results through metrics, through data.” Ultimately, however, the owner operators are free to do what they see fit from a security standpoint, including what equipment to use and what process to employ. U.S. Security’s role is to make sure they understand the options and resources available to them to make their restaurants safer and more secure.McDonald’s U.S. Security team is free to test new technologies and practices, which can then be offered as solutions to the owner operators. In McOpCo restaurants, these new methods and procedures are thoroughly vetted, so by the time they are offered to owner-operator restaurants, US Security knows they are proven solutions.In fact, U.S. Security is also quick to point out that McOpCo’s test bed status is a tool for the owner operator, a resource they can tap into, showing them that certain best practices work and are not merely a corporate push. “What we do from a security standpoint at the corporate level needs to make sense to our owner operators,” explained Jara. “Our McOpCo restaurants provide us an opportunity to showcase new security initiatives, technologies, and put them in place to demonstrate to our owner operator the value that these systems work. This type of relationship is rewarding for us because it gives us the ability to put our influencing skills to work.”In many cases, the regional security managers act as lobbyists at the local co-op meetings. Each major city will have its own co-op, which is a group of owner operators and McOpCo restaurants that hold monthly meetings. “Every co-op gets together each month,” said Ball. “As a security professional, you want to get on those agendas to influence McOpCo’s business and operations, and then hopefully, McOpCo can influence the owner operators on security best practices.”Thus, to the thousands of franchisees across the nation, US Security can take on a number of roles when supporting an owner operator. Depending on the situation, that role could include a security professional resource, a trusted advisor, or a strategic business consultant, with the goal of helping them address all manner of loss prevention program issues. Whether it is offering assistance with the selection of a surveillance camera system, or referring them to an armored car service, assisting with an internal investigation, or serving as a liaison to local law enforcement, US Security is there to consult.Considering that the RSMs don’t have any direct loss prevention staff that report to them, they clearly have a lot on their plates. However, when asked whether he could use more LP staff, Holm replied, “Part of me says yes. It’s a knee-jerk reaction. The thing is, we are not a security company. We are an operations company that sells hamburgers. In that sense, I have 90,000 security members on my staff.”At the end of the day, it is truly remarkable that such a small team is so effective in protecting what just might be the most identifiable brand across the globe. It ultimately comes down to the attitude of retail security pervasiveness throughout the organization, as Holm puts it, “from the boardroom to the crew room.” Every employee is a loss prevention node, and each owner operator has a vested interest in brand protection and the safety and security of McDonald’s restaurants. And with US Security at its best, the brand is in great hands with the Golden Arches shining brightly!EDITOR’S NOTE: McDonald’s, Big Mac, Chicken McNuggets, World Famous Fries, Happy Meal, and The Golden Arches are trademarks of McDonald’s Corporation and its affiliates, and are used with permission.This article was first published in 2015 and updated in February 2016. Stay UpdatedGet critical information for loss prevention professionals, security and retail management delivered right to your inbox.  Sign up nowlast_img read more

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Facebook Testing HTML5 Video for iPad? Apparently Not [UPDATED]

first_imgsarah perez Related Posts A numberofbloggers are today reporting a noticeable change to Facebook’s website when viewed from the built-in Safari web browser on the Apple iPad: videos now work. Previously, videos appearing in a user’s News Feed wouldn’t play on the iPad due to Facebook’s use of Adobe Flash technology, which is not supported. Apple has, somewhat notoriously, banished Flash from its mobile devices, including the iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch, in favor of supporting the HTML5 web standard instead. Although still in development, HTML5, the latest revision to the markup language used to create web pages, offers a feature that allows videos to play in a web browser without the need for a plugin like that used by Adobe Flash.But has Facebook actually implemented HTML5 on its site? UPDATE: According to Facebook, the company is not testing HTML5. Facebook told us in an email that, “All new videos are encoded in h264 format, so we’re playing videos natively in the iPad since it supports h264-encoded videos. It will load them full-screen, similar to what it does for YouTube videos.” Facebook rolled this out last week.In our tests this morning, it appears that Facebook isn’t actually using HTML5 to display the videos. Instead, what appears to be going on is that Facebook.com is detecting that you’ve arrived to the website via the Safari web browser on the iPad. When you then attempt to play a video on the iPad, it doesn’t play inline (something that would have been a clear confirmation of an HTML5 implementation). Instead, Facebook is linking out to the actual video, transcoded to MP4, a video format that plays on Apple devices. We confirmed this by uploading a video file to Facebook in WMV format (a non-iPad compatible video format) and then attempting to play it on the iPad. It played as an MP4 file. Still Being Rolled OutAlso interesting: this implementation of transcoding (converting one format to another) appears to be still in the initial stages of rollout. We went to one user’s News Feed (belonging to our own Marshall Kirkpatrick, in fact) and discovered he had uploaded two video files last night using iCamcorder. On the iPad, the earlier video played, launching as a full-screen MP4. The other, when clicked, informed us that we needed Flash in order to view it. Guide to Performing Bulk Email Verification Tags:#Apple#Facebook#web The Dos and Don’ts of Brand Awareness Videos Both videos were uploaded around the exact same time last night – sometime after midnight EST and the newer one is the one that plays. We’ve asked Facebook to confirm what’s going on here but have not yet heard back. Why Not HTML5? It’s interesting that Facebook has chosen to do transcoding instead of a full HTML5 rollout, especially considering how many other major media sites are making the switch. A number of publishers, when alerted to the iPad’s impending launch, quickly pushed out HTML5-compatible versions of their websites. In many cases though, those changes are just skin-deep. Despite Apple’s claims (via the “iPad-ready websites” section on the company’s website) that many major publishers have switched over to the new web markup language, it’s not an entirely accurate statement. For some of the sites listed, only portions of their content has been made “iPad-ready.” Reuters, Time and MLB.com, for instance, were recently called out for claiming iPad-readiness when, in fact, they don’t offer 100% of their website content for iPad visitors. MLB.com directs you to download an iPad app if you want to see videos, for example, while the other two only offer some of their content in an iPad-ready format. Apparently, using HTML5 throughout the site isn’t required to be dubbed “iPad-ready” by Apple. Now it appears that Facebook is making changes to get on that list, too. Facebook is Becoming Less Personal and More Pro… A Comprehensive Guide to a Content Auditlast_img read more

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Check Your Code with CSS Lint

first_imgGrowing Phone Scams: 5 Tips To Avoid Tags:#hack#Tools Related Posts Why You Love Online Quizzes CSS Lint is a tool for checking your CSS code. Like JSHint and JSLint (see our previous coverage).CSS Lint was created by Nicole Sullivan and Nicholas C. Zakas. Based on the conversations thus far is bound to become as infamous as JSLint. However, since CSS Lint is open source, if you don’t like the rules, you can host your own version and change the rules.Many of the seemingly strange rules (such as “IDs shouldn’t be used in selectors”) stem from object oriented CSS, a paradigm promoted by Sullivan.Here’s a video by Sullivan on the subject:center_img klint finley How to Write a Welcome Email to New Employees? 7 Types of Video that will Make a Massive Impac…last_img read more

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Satellites Could Predict Hazards of Glacial Lake Outbursts

first_imgA small glacier lake known as Nagma Pokhari sits nestled in a valley near Mount Everest in Nepal, surrounded by steep walls of sediment that hold the icy waters in place. Back in June 1980, one of Nagma Pokhari’s dams failed—and the resulting floodwaters inundated and destroyed farms and houses for more than 70 kilometers downstream.In a warming world, the threat of such “glacial lake outburst floods” is becoming increasingly urgent. As glaciers in most parts of the Himalayas melt, floods caused by the bursting of rapidly expanding glacial lakes pose an increasing risk to mountain communities. Predicting which lakes will burst and how much damage they might cause to downstream settlements is a challenge. But a new study finds that a simple satellite index based on the surrounding topography can provide a way to identify which lakes are most at risk of causing a damaging flood to those communities.“There is an urgent need for a reliable way to target potentially dangerous lakes,” says Pradeep Mool, a remote-sensing expert at the International Centre for Integrated Mountain Development (ICIMOD) in Kathmandu.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)There are ways to monitor when the dam of a glacial lake might break: Scientists track the lake’s depth, the geological composition and geometry of its dam, and other factors, such as melting rate and steepness of adjacent glaciers. But with more than 20,000 glacier lakes in the Himalayas, most in remote areas and difficult to access, “it’s impossible to manually monitor them all,” says Koji Fujita, a glaciologist at Nagoya University in Japan, who has been working in Nepal and Bhutan for decades.Another way to assess a lake’s overall danger to downslope communities is to estimate how much floodwater might pour out of it, should a dam burst, Fujita says. He and colleagues thought that the answer to the floodwater question might also lie in the lakes’ moraines—piles of sediments bulldozed by glaciers into high ridges that act as dams. Using now-declassified data from a 1970s- to 1980s-era U.S. spy satellite called Hexagon KH-9, the team estimated changes in the elevations of five moraine dams of lakes that have burst between 1984 and 1994.In all five cases, the moraine dam was flushed out and lowered by the outburst of water, the team found, and the dam’s slope continued to decrease during the flood. The process continued until the slope was about 10o, which the researchers suspect might be a critical threshold for a flood to end, they report in a study in press in Natural Hazards and Earth System Sciences. Changes in the slope of moraine dams are thus “one of the most important parameters when deciding which lakes are dangerous,” Fujita says.Using a modern version of the Hexagon satellite called the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), the team screened 2276 large glacial lakes in the Himalayas and found that 49 of them have potential flood volumes of over 10 million cubic meters, which are generally considered to be major floods. Most of these lakes are in the eastern Himalayas, where glacier lakes are expanding more rapidly than those in other parts of the mountain range mostly due to rising temperatures and decreasing snowfall during the summer monsoon as a result of climate change.The technique, Fujita says, could be used in the initial screening of thousands of large glacial lakes in the Himalayas and continuous monitoring of topographical changes around the lakes as they expand and new moraine dams develop.“It’s a valuable study with important implications for assessing potential hazards of glacial lakes,” says Tobias Bolch, a glaciologist at the University of Zurich in Switzerland. This is the first time that a satellite index is verified by past glacier lake floods, he says. Bolch stresses, however, that elevation estimates from either Hexagon or ASTER are “notoriously tricky” and, therefore, should be confirmed with field investigations.The new satellite index provides an additional criterion for assessing risks of glacier lake floods, Mool says. Fujita’s list of dangerous glacial lakes, however, is quite different from the one made by ICIMOD in 2001. For instance, 23 of the 44 dangerous lakes identified by ICIMOD do not have steep moraine dams, and only five of them have a potential flood volume over 10 million cubic meters.Mool says that ICIMOD took a more integrated, albeit qualitative, approach while making its assessment—taking into account factors such as the distance between the lake and the glacier, the stability of moraine dams, potential landslides, and downstream population and infrastructure. “It’s good to have a quantitative measure,” he says. “But glacier environment is very complicated and no single index is enough.”last_img read more