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German hawk to chair bank of central banks

first_img Share Tuesday 8 September 2015 5:31 am THE BANK for International Settlements (Bis), a bank for, and owned by, the world’s central banks, has appointed German central bank president Jens Weidmann as its chairman. Weidmann has been known for his stance that errs against policy easing. However, in his new role he will have little influence over the action of central banks. He has been critical of the European Central Bank’s recently introduced stimulus programme, known as quantitative easing. The policy uses newly created money to buy mostly government bonds.He says the money printing programme effectively bails out irresponsible governments, both by buying their debt and reducing their borrowing costs, but also by allowing them to delay unpopular reforms to their economies.Weidmann succeeds Christian Noyer, who will serve as chairman until he retires as governor of the Bank of France on 31 October. The Swiss-based Bis facilitates cooperation between national central banks. It also encompasses the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision, which sets rules on capital and liquidity requirements for a number of countries including the UK. German hawk to chair bank of central banks whatsapp whatsappcenter_img by Taboolaby TaboolaSponsored LinksSponsored LinksPromoted LinksPromoted LinksYou May LikeMoneyPailShe Was A Star, Now She Works In ScottsdaleMoneyPailSwift VerdictChrissy Metz, 39, Shows Off Massive Weight Loss In Fierce New PhotoSwift VerdictPost FunKate & Meghan Are Very Different Mothers, These Photos Prove ItPost FunComedyAbandoned Submarines Floating Around the WorldComedyMaternity WeekA Letter From The Devil Written By A Possessed Nun In 1676 Has Been TranslatedMaternity WeekGameday NewsNBA Wife Turns Heads Wherever She GoesGameday NewsEquity MirrorThey Drained Niagara Falls — They Weren’t Prepared For This Sickening DiscoveryEquity Mirrorzenherald.comMeghan Markle Changed This Major Detail On Archies Birth Certificatezenherald.comTheFashionBallAlica Schmidt Is The Most Beautiful Athlete To ExistTheFashionBall Express KCS More From Our Partners White House Again Downplays Fourth Possible Coronvirus Checkvaluewalk.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.org‘Neighbor from hell’ faces new charges after scaring off home buyersnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgInstitutional Investors Turn To Options to Bet Against AMCvaluewalk.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.orgKiller drone ‘hunted down a human target’ without being told tonypost.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.com Show Comments ▼ Tags: NULLlast_img read more

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Transcript: Joe Biden on Hillary Clinton’s medical records and the future of the ‘moonshot’

first_img Vice President Joe Biden spoke with STAT on Friday about the cancer moonshot: what he’s learned about cancer politics, the importance of cancer prevention, and what he plans to do next.He also addressed Hillary Clinton’s recent health and the accompanying media scrutiny, saying he thought she’d “handled it pretty well.” Biden was himself once a candidate with a serious medical history; he nearly died of a brain aneurysm in 1988 and released nearly 50 pages of medical information in the 2008 campaign.“I think I may be different than most of my colleagues overall,” Biden said. “I’ve just found that, in my career, just transparency and disclosure works the best, even when there’s bad stuff.”advertisement I wanted to start off by asking you about the future of the moonshot because a lot of people who I talk to, who want this to succeed, say: ‘You know, this is great, but if we don’t keep it going beyond the end of the year, we’re not going to accomplish what we want to accomplish.’One way or another, we, I, are going to keep this going. I guarantee you. To my surprise, surprise in the sense it was of out of the blue, when I was taking Hillary to my hometown of Scranton and showing her around her grandpop’s hometown, too, she announced to several thousand people at a rally that, “I’m gonna ask Joe to continue to run the moonshot for my administration if I win.”Whether I do that or not explicitly, I don’t know yet. There’s a number of institutions and potential foundational work that’s out there as well. I’ve been meeting with an awful lot of people. What I’ve committed to do is, I’m going to stay involved in this effort as long as I’m alive. And there’s nothing indispensable about me, I’m not trying to make it like only I can do it.But one of the things that I’ve figured out, I didn’t believe at first, that I can bring to the dance here, is that I’m able to gather people up and I’m able to help break down barriers and the good news is that I think whether they’re oncologists, universities, drug companies, patients, they know the depth of my commitment and passion, so I think that gives me some credibility to say things you might not otherwise be able to say or do.Well, I know you try to be humble about it and your own role. But people I talk to say that the fact you’ve become so focused on this is important and does help drive a conversation about it and a lot of emphasis on it.What would it take or what kind of role would you want to have if you were to stay on in a Hillary Clinton administration?Well, I’m not going to stay on in the administration. What Hillary talked about is, as I understood it, me being able to have the same authority over elements of her administration from the outside that I have now from the inside, to be able to coordinate those efforts.We haven’t talked about it yet. And, as my mother would say, I’m not counting my chickens before they’re hatched in terms of I think she’s going to win. But I’m also meeting, Greg and I met with a billionaire philanthropist who has invested hundreds of millions of dollars in this effort. He rode to the airport with me in another city I was in recently, asking me whether I would stay engaged and involved and taking over some or at least engaging with existing philanthropic efforts relating to cancer.I’m meeting with some of the leading people in the country, leading scientists in the country have asked to meet with me to talk about what role I might play post-January 2017. So I’m going to stay engaged, exactly how I don’t know yet.OK. I have to ask about the other side of this equation. Donald Trump hasn’t talked a lot about medical science. I don’t think he’s talked about the cancer moonshot specifically at all. He has talked a little bit about the reality of scarce resources when it comes to federal spending on medical research.What do you think a Trump presidency would mean for the moonshot specifically and for medical science more generally?Well, look, I hope that if he were to somehow pull this off, I mean this sincerely now, I would hope he would bring, attract, out of just pure patriotic necessity, some very good minds to let him know that there is a lot of money we’re spending in the federal government, billions of dollars on medical research, and there is a consensus.And I’m hopeful that we will get significant funding, additional funding for the moonshot this year. There are leaders in the United States Senate, Republicans like the senator from Tennessee, Lamar Alexander. Congressman [Fred] Upton. Not just Democrats, but Republicans who understand that this is not the time to do what the Freedom Caucus guys are doing. The Freedom Caucus guys are arguing we shouldn’t even invest in preventing Zika. “It’s not the government’s role.”I don’t think he’s that crazy. You know, we can afford all this.I took note today that you emphasized prevention several times. Because something I’ve heard a lot and my colleagues have heard a lot from folks in the cancer community is they were a little concerned at the outset that prevention wasn’t being given enough priority. Have you heard those concerns and are you responding to that?Oh yeah. Oh no, we have. We’ve met all over the country with the prevention community. Here’s the thing: Prevention, a lot of it is not rocket science. We know that if we had cessation of smoking in America, you’d save millions of lives.We know that everything relating to the environment, from the water you drink to the air you breathe to the soil that you till, has a real impact on, an environmental impact on causing cancers or exacerbating cancer.But that takes political will. We know there’s a relationship between obesity and stomach fat and cancer. But they require national movements that are to change culture and change the attitude, which we support strongly.What we’re focused on in the moonshot is there are still going to be people, 50 percent of the people out there or more, who are going to get cancer that have nothing to do with the fact they’ve ever smoked or been exposed to smoking, that have nothing to do with the environmental impacts, that are genetically consequential to their genetic makeup.So the research, there are two kinds of research. A little bit like what you guys do in researching how to expand your footprint. I’m not being a wise guy now. The way everything from a university researches how to recruit, to attract students, that’s the research that is designed to impact on public opinion and public behavior, public perception. That’s really important.But the main focus of what we’re doing beyond encouraging that kind of mindset change, is there’s another aspect to prevention. And that is detection. And the acquisition of essentially vaccines to prevent. So you know, measles vaccines are prevention, they prevent people from getting measles. You still want to put yourself in a position where you’re not exposed to measles, you’re in good health, you don’t get run down, etc. But so there are things that relate to prevention, like access to screening, like the thing we did with the Cleveland Clinic, where if we, for example, have screening for lung cancer made more available, more equitably distributed, in neighborhoods where we know there’s concentrations, then we can prevent as well.So there’s the generic prevention pieces, like don’t smoke, don’t drink 20 Big Gulps in a day and don’t end up with four layers of fat tissue around your belt line. That’s one category and that’s critically important and we support those efforts.The second category is the prevention technologies. For example, Greg met when I left L.A. at the last thing I did, how many people? [Greg Simon: “About 15 people.”] Fifteen people representing blood biopsy initiatives. The good news was, there was some collaboration going on among them now, partnerships and learning from each other. But blood biopsies can prevent invasive biopsies, but by finding a marker in your blood. But they can also prevent cancers. Some cancers are so slow-growing that they take two, five, 10, 20 years to grow and with these blood biopsies it leaves the potential that you can prevent them from ever occurring by detecting a marker in the system and treating that now.There’s also new technologies. Like we were out at Huntsman, and they did a lot of great work on hereditary cancers, particularly colon cancer. And so what they figured out is that they found markers in the genomic makeup of individuals. They go back and encourage people, in terms of prevention, do you have history of this in your family, how often do you have it, how many generations, that makes you more susceptible, come in and get this test for the marker. Oh, what’s the marker called for the likelihood for colon cancer? [Greg Simon: “Lynch syndrome.”] Lynch syndrome.Oh right, which was in the Blue Ribbon Panel report.But they were doing that out at Huntsman, right? So I met a guy, for example, he was encouraged to have these colonoscopies, but also they detected Lynch syndrome in his family history. And they said, “Well, you’re likely to be somebody who’s going to get it, so here’s what you do.” Instead of waiting until you’re 50 to get a colonoscopy, you should be getting one when you’re 19 or 20 or 17, and you can take preventative action from ever getting to the point that you get colon cancer.So there’s a lot going on that relates to early detection and new technologies and refining old technologies that can get early on, for example, the onset of lung cancer, the onset of other cancers. That’s a long answer to your question, that there are basic fundamental prevention techniques that — just don’t do it.You talk a lot about cancer politics as well. I know that’s been a favorite thing of yours to mention when discussing the moonshot. I’m curious, more than six months in at this point, have you gotten any specific evidence that the culture is really starting to change and when the vice president isn’t watching, people are going to continue to act differently?I’ve been stunned. I did not expect things to move quite as rapidly as they have. One of the people I appointed to the Blue Ribbon Panel, a really first-rate guy, one of the few I knew personally because he treated me for something else, head of a leading medical school, a department in a medical school. And Greg went to talk to something he’s working on, and he said to me: “I wanted to call you and tell you what a great job Greg did.” He said: “Joe, I want to tell you. When you put me on that Blue Ribbon Panel,” he said, “I was flattered.” But he said: “I know all the guys on there. I thought there would be just nothing but pushback.” He said: “I’ve never seen as much collaboration in my life. It stunned me.”I can give you, and Greg, and Don [Graves], can probably give you more examples of, a dozen examples of people who have said, “Whoa, I didn’t think we’d get this far.” Like you had nine drug companies, or seven drug companies, agreeing to make available for basic research all of the drugs they’ve developed, all of the therapies they’ve developed. So you as a young researcher come along and use any of their drugs for multiple therapies, what do you call it? [Greg Simon: “Combination trials.”] Combination trials, etc. Because what we’ve done is we’ve worked out essentially a licensing agreement ahead of time.It’s like you go and put money in a jukebox and you play a song by whomever, you don’t have to get anybody’s license to the singer to play the song. A license arrangement has already been made. Well, now it’s gone from, what, in terms of the number of drug companies [Greg Simon: “I think it’s upwards of 20.”], now there’s 20. That would have never happened before. They’re figuring out, hey, look, maybe cooperation can be a win-win for us. If this kid comes along and finds the use of my therapy and another therapy, we already have a licensing deal, I’ll make money off of that.So I’m not saying all of a sudden there’s this selflessness that’s occurred. But the medical culture, I think, was a little embarrassed, at least in my view, because I don’t think they realized how different their culture was than other sciences. I remember down speaking to five, six thousand members of the AACR, I think it was that many. A gigantic number.And I said, you know, guys, I said, the kind of example I used today. “If we give an astronomer to study the effects of zero gravity on longevity, and they finish their report, they have to immediately make it available to the whole world. You guys, you guys hide it. You don’t do anything with it. First of all, half of you aren’t reporting like you’re supposed to report for these clinical trials. Secondly, some of you, even in your report, you don’t give any detail. What you’re doing is you’re hiding behind publications for a year, the publications cost from $20,000 to $100,000 a year to subscribe to some of these outfits. Then you don’t give the whole megillah here. So what’s with you guys?”And I fully expect we’re going to get booed. And when I said, “And ability to qualify for grants from NIH depends not totally on your scholarship or your ingenuity. It depends on whether or not you have somebody’s already recognized, already has a laboratory, and then even then there’s no sharing.” When some breakthrough comes, it doesn’t come as the Simon-Biden. I’m the young guy — I wish I were — Greg Simon, he’s a well-known guy, and I contributed a lot to it. I don’t get recognition and the recognition comes from publication.And so there’s a whole culture that I really think a lot of these guys went like: “Oh well.” I mean, they kind of knew but they didn’t know. Quite frankly, I think sometimes holding the mirror up can have a pretty profound impact. My sense is, for example, when the New England medical journal, I talked about the big data. The guy says, I’m paraphrasing, “Biden’s encouraging data parasites.” Well guess what, he got the living crap kicked out of him. I didn’t say a word. I never met the guy. It was all some mea culpa, mea culpa, mea maxima culpa. I’m sorry, I’m sorry, I’m hardly sorry.By the way, a lot of these guys and women at outfits like Anderson and others — they’re under enormous pressure, implicit pressure, not to share because they want it to come out of Anderson. Well, if they share, and it’s like now, Anderson and Jefferson in Philly, that’s not, no. I joked before, you might have heard this story, if you have, stop me — the story about Lawton Chiles, Senator Chiles.I don’t know that I have heard that one.Well, he was a great guy, he got elected in 1970s. His nickname was Walkin’ Lawton. He was smart as hell. He used to talk about that he was the he-coon, meaning raccoon, among Cajun boys. He would talk about, he would downplay, he’s just a good old cracker and everything. Smart as hell. Went on to be governor as well in Florida.I remember in 1973, he got elected in ’70, he had been insurance commissioner in Florida. We’re riding over in the subway in the Senate, to go to the escalator. You know the subways have the plastic shield in the front. Subway comes to a stop and the escalator’s there. At the top of the steps, to my recollection, was Ben Bradlee of the Washington Post and Woodward and Bernstein standing at the end of the escalator. And he turns to me, he said: “Joe, why do I get the feeling that those boys are looking at me like I’m a Pulitzer Prize about to be won?” I’ll never forget that.Well, an awful lot of the guys and women I met sort of walk by the mirror and go: “Nobel Prize.” You don’t usually win the Nobel Prize in their minds by sharing. I’m exaggerating to make a point, but I really do think two things are happening.I think one, there’s a recognition that, just their sense of obligation and the reason why they took the Hippocratic oath, the breakthroughs are on the horizon and they’re more likely to occur faster if there is collaboration. But two, I think they’re realizing that there is plenty of credit to go around. That they can be part of something bigger, rather than waiting to be the only guy or woman on the stage. They can be part of something that’s much, much bigger. I don’t know how to explain it better than that.By the way, I can’t prove anything of this. It’s just instinct.We may be kidding ourselves, but there’s a lot less pushback now on me. Maybe it’s because they think I’m going to go away, maybe they think this is just a phase of the moon. I don’t know. But I don’t think so. I’ve just got a feeling. I think by the president looking to me to do this now, it’s allowed me, because I have a platform and because I’m not running, to really raise the public profile and give people hope that we can actually do something.Because so many people, I haven’t gone and looked at the polling data lately, but you ask people, I bet if you ask them three years ago, do you think we can cure cancer? You get: “Well, I don’t know.” Whatever that number was five years ago, I bet you it’s two, three, four times that now. Just because, it’s like: “Oh, oh maybe. OK, maybe. Maybe.”Would you indulge me one non-moonshot question? I feel obligated to ask about this because of the news of the last week. You have an extensive medical history, and in 2008 you released a lot of medical records detailing that.I did.I’m curious if you’ve spoken with Secretary Clinton about her recent health.No, I haven’t had a chance.How do you think she’s handled it?Well, I think she’s handled it pretty well in the sense that she’s laid out everything from, you know, what happened when she fell, what happened with the blood clot, that she’s taking Coumadin. I had a pretty extensive medical history. And the reason I put it out is because a lot of people with my medical history didn’t make it. And I wanted to make sure people know that what I had you either fix or die. You know what I mean? But if you fix it, you fix it. But I gave all my records.But then again, look, I have a different, I don’t know. I think I may be different than most of my colleagues overall. I’ve just found that, in my career, just transparency and disclosure works the best, even when there’s bad stuff. During the interview, Biden was accompanied by Greg Simon, the executive director of the task force overseeing the cancer research initiative.The full conversation is below, lightly edited for readability and length.advertisement ExclusiveTranscript: Joe Biden on Hillary Clinton’s medical records and the future of the ‘moonshot’ Related: Vice President Joe Biden gives a speech about the White House cancer moonshot, an initiative he leads, on Friday at Rice University in Houston. Brett Coomer/Houston Chronicle via AP In interview, Biden outlines a lifelong role in cancer research, but not in a Clinton White House Tags cancerJoe Bidenmoonshotpolicy By Dylan Scott Sept. 19, 2016 Reprintslast_img read more

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Historic Berlin school trip for Portlaoise students

first_imgHome News Education Historic Berlin school trip for Portlaoise students NewsEducation Historic Berlin school trip for Portlaoise students Community Facebook By LaoisToday Reporter – 2nd November 2018 Laois secondary school announces scholarship winners for new academic year Charlie Flanagan on Electric Picnic: ‘I’d ask organisers to consult with community leaders’ WhatsApp Scoil Chriost Ri Leaving Cert students during their trip to Germany last weekSEE ALSO – Electric Emma leads St Paul’s to minor football glory Facebook Scoil Chriost Ri Leaving Cert students during their trip to Germany last week Over forty Scoil Chríost Rí students headed to Germany on Thursday morning for the school’s first overseas Leaving Cert History school tour.The number of students taking History at Senior Cycle in the school has increased steadily over the past few years and the enthusiasm for the subject was clear to see as the group took in all the main sites in the historic city of Berlin.The tour began with a guided city tour before an ascent to the top of the famous Berlin TV Tower at night, a symbol of the old East German regime which offered spectacular views of the city.The next morning saw the girls visit Sachsenhausen concentration camp, the headquarters of the Nazi’s Holocaust administration.Over 200,000 opponents of Adolf Hitler’s policies perished at the camp located just under an hour from the city, and the trip was deeply poignant for the students who got to see the conditions inflicted on Jews and other minority groups in the early 1940s.Next was the Berlin Olympicstadion, site of Hitler’s 1936 Olympic Games which were designed as a major propaganda campaign for the superiority of the Germans but were upstaged by Jesse Owens. The night was completed by a visit to the German government, the spectacular Reichstag buildings.Visits to the Berlin Wall Memorial, Checkpoint Charlie and the fascinating Story of Berlin Museum completed the historical aspect of the 3-day trip, rounded off by a shopping spree at the Mall of Berlin.The tour provided the students with a first-hand experience of a central part of the Leaving Cert History course and was thoroughly enjoyed by each and every one of the girls and their five accompanying teachers. New Arles road opens but disquiet over who was invited to official opening center_img Community Previous articleMen Ending Domestic Abuse is a regional programme offering help to those who need itNext articlePortlaoise hurling manager Fennelly hoping for Leinster run LaoisToday Reporter Twitter Pinterest Council TAGSBerlinGermanyScoil Chriost Ri Pinterest WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitterlast_img read more

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FAIR Canada calls on Ottawa to strengthen OBSI

James Langton Related news The Canadian Foundation for Advancement of Investor Rights (FAIR Canada) has published an open letter it sent to Flaherty, calling on him to designate OBSI as the sole provider of external dispute resolution for financial client complaints, and to make the recommendations of OBSI binding. The move comes after TD Bank withdrew from OBSI at the end of October. Three years ago, Royal Bank also left the service. FAIR argues that, “A single dispute resolution service provider is necessary in order to avoid fragmentation, inconsistencies, serious potential conflicts of interest, consumer confusion, and to enable the detection of systemic or widespread issues. It is not in the public interest to permit multiple [external dispute resolution] providers.” It maintains that OBSI is “an essential, simple, inexpensive service for consumers, even though it is a system in which member firms hold a great deal of power, expertise and knowledge.” And, it says that allowing banks to opt out and use another dispute resolution service “threatens the existence of OBSI and jeopardizes the fairness and independence enshrined in the current system. It is not in the public interest to permit multiple EDR providers, particularly where the financial institutions choose and compensate private, for-profit providers.” FAIR points out that OBSI was created by the industry to avoid the government imposing a dispute resolution service on it, but it says the industry is now “attacking the entity it created and supported for the level of independence it has achieved and for not being subservient to the industry’s interests.” Moreover, it says that the financial industry has no real basis for its complaints about OBSI. “The ‘Occupy’ protests reflect a growing distrust of the current financial system and industry’s campaign against OBSI reinforces the negative perception of the financial industry, to which the financial industry should be mindful,” it warns. “As the Minister responsible for banking and the champion of a national securities regulator, we urge you to act now to prevent industry from retaining multiple providers of EDR services,” it says. “Put OBSI on a stronger footing through permanent legislative authority on a national level. When a national securities regulator comes into being, a single EDR service should also be mandatory.” Keywords Complaints,  Dispute resolutionCompanies FAIR Canada, Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments An investor advocacy group is calling on federal finance minister Jim Flaherty to compel banks to belong to the Ombudsman for Banking Services and Investments, following the second major defection from the dispute resolution service. Future of OBSI is up in the air OBSI updates terms of reference Insurance OmbudService makes western expansion a priority FCAC to probe banks’ complaints handling processes Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media read more

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Moody’s cuts G20 growth forecast

The lower forecasts come as Moody’s revised downwards its growth forecasts for the emerging G20 economies, due to a weaker environment generally and decelerating domestic demand. Overall, it now expects real growth in these economies to be around 5.2% in 2012, compared with its earlier forecast of 5.8%, and around 5.7% in 2013, compared with 6.0% previously. “We are revising downwards our forecast for these large emerging market economies, where the weaker external environment and decelerating domestic demand are causing a slowdown in growth momentum,” says Elena Duggar, Moody’s group credit officer for sovereign risk. “We continue to expect that the slowdown in advanced economies and volatile capital flows will suppress growth in emerging markets.” Moody’s also says it continues to expect only a modest recovery in the G20 advanced economies, with real growth of around 1.4% in 2012 and 2.0% in 2013, which is in line with its previous forecasts. “We maintain our forecast for relatively robust growth in the U.S. and we continue to expect that the euro area as a whole will experience a mild recession in 2012. Financial markets volatility, fiscal consolidation efforts, weak consumer and business confidence, persistently high unemployment levels, and real-estate market weaknesses will continue to constrain growth in advanced economies,” it says. Additionally, it notes that it sees elevated downside risks, which would pose a serious threat to the outlook for global growth if they are realized. The main risks to the outlook include: a deeper than expected recession in the euro area, a hard landing in major emerging markets, an oil-price supply-side shock resulting from resurfacing geopolitical risks, and a sudden and sharp fiscal tightening in the U.S. in 2013. Companies Moody’s Investors Service Moody’s Investors Service has cut its growth forecast, citing slower than expected growth in emerging market economies, and noting that serious downside risks remain. The rating agency says that it now expects real growth in the G20 economies of around 2.8% in 2012 and 3.4% in 2013, down 0.2% and 0.1% from previous expectations. Therefore, real growth in 2012 will be materially lower than the 3.2% growth experienced in 2011 and the 4.6% growth in 2010, it says. Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Share this article and your comments with peers on social media James Langton read more

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TSX ends lower on weakened commodities, jobs numbers

Stocks lost the momentum that was built up in the morning, particularly on Wall Street, after the U.S. government reported that the country’s unemployment rate fell below eight per cent for the first time since January 2009, while hiring increased to 114,000 jobs in September. The Canadian dollar rose 0.17 of a cent to 102.16 cents US, adding slightly to a gain of more than seven-tenths of a cent earlier in the day. In Canada, the jobs data was mixed with the unemployment rate rising one-tenth of a point to 7.4 per cent in September even as the economy added 52,100 jobs — five times the number expected. The report was well received by many economists given the signs of weakness that permeate the Canadian economy, but BMO Financial Group chief economist Sherry Cooper warned that the outlook for the country is still clouded. “The Canadian economy might not be as close to full-employment as we think,” she wrote in a note. “With an overvalued currency, tightened credit conditions and the prospect of higher interest rates, the economy could be vulnerable to a further slowdown from the under two per cent pace recorded so far this year.” Despite the mixed day, the Dow managed to reach a milestone: its highest close since December 2007. The Dow Jones industrials moved 34.79 points higher to 13,610.15, an increase of 1.3 per cent from a week earlier. The Nasdaq composite index lost 13.27 points to 3,136.19 and the S&P 500 index dropped 0.47 of a point to 1,460.93. “The magnitude of improvement has been pretty material,” said Monika Skiba, senior portfolio manager at Manulife Asset Management. “We’re starting to see some signs that the three rounds of quantitative easing have sort of helped at least the U.S. to muddle through.” The TSX energy sector fell 0.8 per cent. November crude on the New York Mercantile Exchange dropped $1.83 to end at US$89.88 a barrel, a decline of 2.5 per cent from a week ago. Traders have been trying to gauge the strength of global oil demand while also watching developments surrounding Syria for any signs of a disruption in supplies from the Middle East. December gold bullion dropped $15.70 to US$1,780.80 an ounce, closing at its lowest levels of the week. December copper was down 0.8 of a cent at US$3.78 a pound. The TSX industrials sector increased 0.5 per cent with Canadian Pacific (TSX:CP) rising $1.49 to $86.98. In corporate news, Ottawa is extending its review of a proposed $6-billion takeover of Progress Energy Resources Corp. (TSX:PRQ) by Malaysia’s Petronas to Oct. 19. The deal faces the key “net benefit” test under the Investment Canada Act. Progress shares were up six cents to $21.85. And the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note rose to 1.73 per cent from 1.68 per cent as investors shifted money from bonds into stocks. Related news Share this article and your comments with peers on social media S&P/TSX composite hits highest close since March on strength of financials sector Toronto stock market dips on weakness in the energy and financials sectors David Friend The Toronto stock market closed lower on Friday as commodities weakened and the shine wore off jobs reports from both the U.S. and Canada. The S&P/TSX composite index dropped 28.69 points to 12,418.99 — up 0.8 per cent from where it closed last Friday. The TSX Venture Exchange was up 4.13 points at 1,344.98. Keywords Marketwatch TSX gets lift from financials, U.S. markets rise to highest since March Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

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Brandes rebrands as Bridgehouse

Bridgehouse Asset Managers, the new retail trade name for Brandes Investment Partners & Co., signals the expanded offering of investment products from three asset management firms, the Toronto-based company said Thursday. Bridgehouse distributes investments from San Diego-based Brandes Investment Partners. L.P., Toronto-based Sionna Investment Managers Inc., and New York City-based Lazard Asset Management (LAM). CPPIB reports record return for latest fiscal year iA Clarington aims for sleeker, cleaner product lineup Keywords Fund companies,  Asset management companiesCompanies Brandes Investment Partners & Co., Bridgehouse Asset Managers Desjardins buys Montreal boutique firm Hexavest Operating from Brandes’ Toronto offices, Bridgehouse will provide investment products and services to Canadian investors and financial advisors. “The Bridgehouse brand creates a powerful distinction between the investment management of our solutions and our marketing efforts in Canada. Bridgehouse is about providing direct access — the bridge — to these managers to financial advisors and their clients.” says Carol Lynde, Bridgehouse president and COO. Bridgehouse branding is reflected in the firm’s new website, www.bridgehousecanada.com, as well as in marketing efforts and investor reporting in combination with Brandes LP, Sionna and LAM branding. As a related element of this branding reorganization, effective May 29, the family of prospectus qualified mutual funds known as the Brandes Funds are re-captioned as the Bridgehouse Funds with five funds renamed. “Bridgehouse Asset Managers has established a unique and collaborative model that is enduring and trustworthy,” says Brandes CEO Oliver Murray. “We have built a solid, proven structure that creates the stability investors and advisors are seeking by aligning the long-term interests of all parties. We believe ‘Bridgehouse’ properly captures the enduring nature of our relationships with Sionna and Lazard Asset Management.” IE Staff Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Facebook LinkedIn Twitter read more

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G-G Says Efforts to Fight Crime Must Be Revitalised

first_imgRelatedG-G Says Efforts to Fight Crime Must Be Revitalised G-G Says Efforts to Fight Crime Must Be Revitalised Governor GeneralApril 7, 2009 RelatedG-G Says Efforts to Fight Crime Must Be Revitalised RelatedG-G Says Efforts to Fight Crime Must Be Revitalisedcenter_img FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail Governor-General, His Excellency, the Most Hon. Dr. Patrick Allen, has underscored the need for revitalised efforts at fighting crime, which he described as a “scourge” that “constitutes a major social and economic problem.”Dr. Allen, who was delivering his first Throne Speech during the State Opening of Parliament in Gordon House on April 7, urged that efforts be made to enhance the requisite mechanisms in order to counter criminal activity of all forms, including putting the necessary legislation in place.“The measures to fight crime must be supported by strong legislative action, improved management of our security forces, greater accountability, and a strengthening of the partnership between the security forces and the citizenry,” Dr. Allen stated.He said that the Government would be moving to implement the recommendations of the Jamaica Constabulary Force’s (JCF) strategic review this Parliamentary year, to address corruption within the force.“The efforts to root out corruption within the Force and rebuild public confidence in our law enforcement machinery will be intensified,” he informed, noting that the recommendations were also aimed at improving the quality of the organisation, thereby ensuring proper management and accountability.Turning to initiatives to stamp out corruption within the broader context, the Governor-General said that legislation to establish an Independent Commission of Investigations to look into cases of abuse of authority had been considered by a Joint Select Committee of Parliament, which has tabled a report. It is expected that this legislation will be enacted this year.He further informed that the Bill to establish a Special Prosecutor to investigate and prosecute corrupt practices has been the subject of rigorous scrutiny by a Joint Select Committee of Parliament and “the Government expects to have this Bill debated and passed as a matter of urgency.”Turning to the justice agenda, Dr. Allen indicated that the Justice Reform Programme, which was aimed at reducing the backlog of cases in the judicial system, would be intensified, with the establishment of the Court Management Services this year, to “consolidate and improve the management of our courts.” Advertisementslast_img read more

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Uganda: UN chief calls for ‘inclusive, transparent and peaceful’ elections

first_imgUganda: UN chief calls for ‘inclusive, transparent and peaceful’ elections The United NationsThe UN chief on Wednesday issued a call for an “inclusive, transparent and peaceful” election process across Uganda, a day ahead of the polls opening.With presidential and parliamentary elections scheduled to take place on 14 January, SecretaryGeneral António Guterres raised concern over reports of violence and tensions in parts of the country and implored all political actors and their supporters to “refrain from the use of hate speech, intimidation and violence”.“Any electoral disputes should be resolved through legal and peaceful means”, he said in a statement.Our shared responsibility is to promote a peaceful and prosperous Uganda. Promote peaceful elections #Peace1stUganda #UgandaDecides2021 pic.twitter.com/70mR1s8lAP— UN in Uganda (@UNinUganda) January 13, 2021 Election credibility One of Africa’s longest-serving leaders, Yoweri Museveni, is seeking his sixth term in office, and competing against 10 other candidates to retain the presidency, including the popular singer Bobi Wine.Last week, the UN human rights office, OHCHR, noted the “deteriorating human rights situation” ahead of Thursday’s vote, calling on the Government to take measures to prevent electoral violence.OHCHR reported numerous rights violations including cases of arbitrary arrest, detention and torture. At least 55 people were killed in November during riots and protests over the arrest of Mr. Wine, whose real name is Robert Kyagulanyi.According to news reports, the European Union said on Tuesday that the electoral process had been seriously tarnished by the use of excessive force.In a television address on Tuesday, President Museveni said that foreign partners did not understand that Uganda’s strength came from the ruling National Resistance Movement (NRM), the army and the economy.At the same time, hundreds of Ugandan civil society organizations have reported that only 10 of their 1,900 accreditation requests had been granted.On Tuesday, according to news reports., Uganda’s communications regulator ordered telecoms companies to block access to messaging and social media apps, shortly after Facebook said that it had closed “fake” accounts, it said were linked to the Government.A plea for ‘maximum restraint’ In his statement, Secretary-General Guterres called on the Ugandan authorities, particularly the security forces, to “show maximum restraint during this period and act according to established human rights principles”.  He concluded by reiterating the UN’s commitment “to support the country’s efforts to promote sustainable development and build a prosperous future”.  /UN News Release. This material comes from the originating organization and may be of a point-in-time nature, edited for clarity, style and length. View in full here. Why?Well, unlike many news organisations, we have no sponsors, no corporate or ideological interests. We don’t put up a paywall – we believe in free access to information of public interest. Media ownership in Australia is one of the most concentrated in the world (Learn more). Since the trend of consolidation is and has historically been upward, fewer and fewer individuals or organizations control increasing shares of the mass media in our country. According to independent assessment, about 98% of the media sector is held by three conglomerates. This tendency is not only totally unacceptable, but also to a degree frightening). Learn more hereWe endeavour to provide the community with real-time access to true unfiltered news firsthand from primary sources. It is a bumpy road with all sorties of difficulties. We can only achieve this goal together. Our website is open to any citizen journalists and organizations who want to contribute, publish high-quality insights or send media releases to improve public access to impartial information. You and we have the right to know, learn, read, hear what and how we deem appropriate.Your support is greatly appreciated. All donations are kept completely private and confidential.Thank you in advance!Tags:Africa, communications, detention, Europe, european, European Union, Facebook, Government, Human Rights, presidency, President, Secretary-General, security, social media, sustainable, Uganda, UNlast_img read more

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Faculty in Focus: At 99, botanist’s love of lichens still going strong

first_imgBotanist William Weber examines a specimen under a microscope. Credit: W.A. Weber collection William Weber (seated, center) poses with the three lifetime achievement awards he won this summer. From left to right: Frank Bungartz, collections manager of lichens at Arizona State University, Doug Ladd, president of the American Bryological and Lichenological Society, daughter Heather Harris and CU Boulder’s Tim Hogan and Erin Tripp. Credit: Heidi Alina“Our strength is Colorado, but for Dr. Weber, the herbarium was only meaningful when put into a global context because plants and fungi get around the world,” she said. The current team at the CU Boulder herbarium includes Tripp, Hogan and Dina Clark, also a collections manager of botany. Today, Weber is fond of sharing stories about his globe-trotting adventures and his turn as Boris Kolenkhov, a Russian dancing master, in a local production of the play You Can’t Take It with You. In May, he also walked part of the BolderBOULDER using his walker, which carried a sign reading “100 years young. Still going strong.” Two species of lichen you may spot hiking in Colorado: Vulpicida pinastri (top) and Bryoria fuscescens (bottom). Credits: CC photo by Selso via Wikimedia Commons; CC photo by Jerzy Opioła via Wikimedia Commons Weber, who will turn 100 in November, is a botanist and a professor emeritus at CU Boulder. His namesake lichen, Lecanora weberi, grows on a rock in the community’s memorial garden. It’s a seafoam-colored species with specks of orange.The lichen is one of about 30 species named after Weber, who joined the CU Boulder faculty in 1946—first as a lecturer in biology and then as a curator in the Museum of Natural History. These “eponyms” include Saussurea weberi, a rare plant with purple flowers from Colorado, and Metzgeria weberi, a liverwort from New Guinea.They’re a testament to Weber’s decades of work spent scouring Colorado and far-flung locales, such as New Guinea and the Galápagos Islands, to find new flowering plants, mosses and lichens. Another testament to the almost-centenarian’s career are the three lifetime achievement awards in botany that he received this summer. They include the Acharius Medal for Outstanding Contributions to Lichenology from the International Association for Lichenology. The medal is the highest honor a scientist can receive for studying these strange organisms—in which fungi and single-celled algae or cyanobacteria work together to grow and thrive.  Erin Tripp, the current curator of botany at the Museum of Natural History, said that the awards are a well-deserved recognition for a decades-spanning career. Weber founded the museum’s herbarium collection, which today includes roughly 600,000 specimens—ranging from colorful lilies to forest mushrooms.“There are very few human beings that have had the kind of expertise that he has—not just in flowering plants, but in mosses and lichens, too,” said Tripp, also an assistant professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. “He’s done everything.”Weber, however, hasn’t let the honors go to his head. “I take these things in stride,” he said. “I knew how to grow paramecium and amoebas, and I was spouting Latin names when I was this little tiny thing,” Weber said from an easy chair in his Boulder apartment. As a child growing up in Manhattan, he rubbed shoulders with some of New York City’s most prominent naturalists. Famed botanist Elizabeth Gertrude Britton personally ejected Weber from a public garden after he tried to steal a leaf from a skunk cabbage for show-and-tell at his school.  He never lost that excitement for the natural world, said Tim Hogan, collections manager of botany at the Museum of Natural History. “He always had this little boy enthusiasm about plants,” said Hogan, who worked with Weber at the university. “He would tell you, ‘Come here and look at this.’”Still, when Weber arrived at CU Boulder, it was no place for an avid botanist. The university’s plant holdings at that time included fewer than 50,000 specimens. He convinced the then director of the museum to begin a real herbarium, which for years occupied half of an attic on campus, and set about collecting.  “I began to make a manuscript of the plants of the Flatirons, for example, then Boulder, County, then the state of Colorado and so on,” he said.Weber covered a lot of ground before he retired from CU Boulder in 1990. The scientist studied and collected flowering plants, mosses and lichens from every continent except Africa. He spent a year in Sweden, searched for plants in the mountains of Nepal and was the first researcher to make an exhaustive study of the lichens of the Galápagos. As a result, researchers from around the world now turn to the CU Boulder herbarium to study the evolution and ecology of plants and other organisms, Tripp said.  Share Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail By Daniel Strain • Published: Sept. 17, 2018 Banner image: William Weber, a professor emeritus at CU Boulder, has received three lifetime achievement awards for his research on lichens and mosses. (Credit: AC Violet, CU Boulder Libraries)William Weber claims a unique honor at his retirement community in Boulder: In the garden behind this complex is a species of lichen named after him.  From plants to lichensIn addition to the Acharius Medal, which was awarded in July, Weber was the first-ever recipient in August of two honors from the American Bryological and Lichenological Society. They were the Chicita Culberson Award for Lifetime Achievement in Lichenology and the Elizabeth Britton Award for Lifetime Achievement in Bryology—named after the same Elizabeth Britton who once kicked a young Weber out of a garden in New York.Weber said what he’s most proud of about CU Boulder’s herbarium collection—which like that lichen in his backyard, is now named after him—isn’t its size but its diversity. More than 40 percent of the specimens in the Museum of Natural History’s collection are mosses and lichens. They include Colorado species like the pale-footed horsehair lichen (Bryoria fuscescens), which grows like a ponytail on tree branches, and the powdered sunshine lichen (Vulpicida pinastri), which looks a bit like a small head of cabbage. Casual hikers might not take note of these growths, but Weber said that lichen lineages are likely hundreds of millions of years old. By studying where and how lichens grow, scientists can learn a lot about how continents and life moved across the globe. “I am proud of the fact that, unlike most herbaria that are [made up of] flowering plants, we have an excellent collection of fungi, lichens, algae,” Weber said. “That’s what I’m very proud to leave behind.” Categories:Faculty in FocusCampus Community Specimen of Saussurea weberi, a flowering plant named after William Weber. Credit: CU Museum of Natural History Herbarium William Weber (second from left) poses with other members of the Sialis Bird Club, a group he founded in New York City in the 1930s. Credit: W.A. Weber collectionColorado to the GalapagosHe’s had plenty of time to practice. The scientist was 5-years-old when his cousin, a naturalist himself, gave Weber his first microscope.last_img read more