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Let’s not squander this unique opportunity to harness the benefits of a new model for work

first_img City A.M.’s opinion pages are a place for thought-provoking views and debate. These views are not necessarily shared by City A.M. With more time at home and no daily commute during lockdown, transport emissions are obviously down. Moreover, BRITA’s new research identified a 45 per cent decrease in the number of people buying single-use plastic bottled water on-the-go. Compare that to the company’s finding two years previously that convenience was a pivotal factor behind low uptake of refillable bottles, with travel and meal deals driving purchases of bottled water.  A cultural shift which had been sluggishly progressing for decades has been turbocharged by the pandemic. The stigma around working from home disappeared overnight and the overriding convenience factor for unsustainable choices, from plastic-filled takeaway lunches to frequent flying, is diminishing. The truth is that rethinking the entire model of “going to work” is long overdue. New research by BRITA UK, published today, shows that 61 per cent of those in employment pre-lockdown are expecting to work remotely at least part time even afterwards. This is a conversation employers need to be having.   Continuing this model will not only be key to supporting women’s careers and increasing workforce diversity, but enable anyone with caring responsibilities — men included — to participate more fully in family life. Denise WilsonDenise Wilson OBE is chief executive of the Hampton Alexander Review More From Our Partners A ProPublica investigation has caused outrage in the U.S. this weekvaluewalk.comBiden received funds from top Russia lobbyist before Nord Stream 2 giveawaynypost.comBrave 7-Year-old Boy Swims an Hour to Rescue His Dad and Little Sistergoodnewsnetwork.orgWhy people are finding dryer sheets in their mailboxesnypost.comAstounding Fossil Discovery in California After Man Looks Closelygoodnewsnetwork.orgRussell Wilson, AOC among many voicing support for Naomi Osakacbsnews.comPolice Capture Elusive Tiger Poacher After 20 Years of Pursuing the Huntergoodnewsnetwork.orgFlorida woman allegedly crashes children’s birthday party, rapes teennypost.comNative American Tribe Gets Back Sacred Island Taken 160 Years Agogoodnewsnetwork.org The mass work-from-home experiment over the past four months has not only saved them, but shown that it is possible to fundamentally shift ways of working while continuing to be productive and deliver results. The mass work-from-home experiment has shown that it is possible to fundamentally shift ways of working (Getty Images) Rigid office hours combined with a lack of affordable childcare provision have long been a barrier to working parents’ careers, particularly to women (who, as the pandemic exposed, bear a disproportionate burden of household and caring responsibilities). For months now, agile and remote working has enabled parents to fit their jobs around childcare, working in a way that best suits them and their families, without negatively impacting their productivity.  Now, there’s no longer room for excuses. Rather than talking about “back to normal”, smart businesses are considering their post-Covid “new normal”, with the recent experiment in the use of remote technology shining a welcome spotlight on outdated ways of working.  Opinion Main image credit: Getty As workers embrace new habits and ways of working, businesses need to play their part to encourage more agile working for the long term, and build back better for society and the environment. We have the time and space to lead our lives in a way that works for us all — and the planet. The opportunity to do things differently in the world of work is there for the taking. Let’s not squander it. We should also not forget that the new talent business is keen to attract is hungry for change. People’s experiences during lockdown are shaping their outlook and will undoubtedly impact what they look for from a career. Of course, working collaboratively in an office has value, but it doesn’t have to be every day or apply to every employee. It would seem the majority of us don’t want to go back to the way things were — indeed, BRITA found that 71 per cent of us now believe we should be more willing to change behaviour if necessary to respond to a crisis. Thursday 30 July 2020 4:55 am whatsapp The mass work-from-home experiment has shown that it is possible to fundamentally shift ways of working (Getty Images) Also Read: Let’s not squander this unique opportunity to harness the benefits of a new model for work While it’s important to support our hospitality sector, lunching at home or locally at least some days could have a big impact on litter levels and unnecessary use of disposable bottles or coffee cups. Let’s not squander this unique opportunity to harness the benefits of a new model for work Before the pandemic, more and more business leaders were starting to understand the case for a flexible workforce, and the technology has been there for years. Yet too many were slow to adapt.  Share Interestingly, it appears that more flexibility could have benefits for the environment too. As Britain embarks on the journey to net zero carbon emissions, this is a priority no business can afford to ignore.  When we consider the future of work, we need to look at the benefits an increase in flexibility can bring, starting with improving equality and diversity.  Companies are questioning whether all those face-to-face meetings that required flying around the world are really necessary, given the financial, environmental and personal impact. Some big names like Google and Twitter are extending home-working until at least next year, and a wider conversation is underway across the business community about the negative effect of the daily commute on employees’ health and their pockets. The mass work-from-home experiment has shown that it is possible to fundamentally shift ways of working (Getty Images) Also Read: Let’s not squander this unique opportunity to harness the benefits of a new model for work Show Comments ▼ whatsapp It’s no stretch to say that, without remote working, thousands of businesses would have ground to a halt over lockdown. last_img read more

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Governor opens doors for annual holiday open house

first_imgArts & Culture | Community | Food | Juneau | Southeast | State GovernmentGovernor opens doors for annual holiday open houseDecember 9, 2015 by Elizabeth Jenkins Share:The governor and first lady pose for photos inside the mansion. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) Workers helped prep over 25,000 cookies. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) Lt. Governor Byron Mallott peers at gingerbread houses made by children. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) First lady Donna Walker shows her grandchildren the nativity set. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) A crowd waits outside for a peek inside the governor’s house. (Photo by Elizabeth Jenkins/KTOO) 1234567 read more

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Is ANSEP good for Mt. Edgecumbe? Students aren’t so sure

first_imgAlaska Native Government & Policy | Education | Southeast | State GovernmentIs ANSEP good for Mt. Edgecumbe? Students aren’t so sureFebruary 8, 2016 by Emily Kwong, KCAW – Sitka Share:Erica Willis and Xochitl Martinez have spoken critically about ANSEP’s proposal to turn Mt. Edgecumbe into an accelerated high school. (Photo by Emily Kwong/KCAW)The past three weeks have been turbulent at Mt. Edgecumbe High School in Sitka. The Alaska Native Science and Engineering Program, or ANSEP, has proposed turning the 70-year-old boarding school into an accelerated high school, with an emphasis on science and engineering.It all began when ANSEP founder Herb Schroeder presented his idea to lawmakers in January, as a draft piece of legislation.Now, Edgecumbe students and teachers are asking questions about ANSEP’s motivations and whether the plan would even work.Erica Willis and Xochitl Martinez are in Mt. Edgecumbe’s radio club. They broadcast every other week.“The past week or two have left our school in a bit of a tizzy due to a situation that’s come up,” Martinez said during a broadcast.For anyone listening to their program, you can tell these two students are not pleased.“Though our school and ANSEP have had good relations and a strong partnership in the past, this was brought before the legislature without consulting any of the people who actually run Edgecumbe,” Willis said in the broadcast.Nor did ANSEP secure the approval of the state Department of Education and Early Development, the Board of Regents or the University of Alaska, who would absorb any retained Edgecumbe staff should the plan roll through.Martinez said she is confused as to why Schroeder, ANSEP’s founder, wanted to take over instead of collaborate.“Why didn’t he come talk to Edgecumbe about inputting more STEM classes or integrating a program that would fast-track kids through three years, but at the same time they would keep the old program?” she asked. “I don’t see why that couldn’t work and why he would just go straight to legislature. I mean, dude.”Historically, the institutions have been friendly, if casual, partners. ANSEP has trained Edgecumbe teachers. Edgecumbe kids have flown up to Anchorage taken part in ANSEP’s summer programs.Martinez said one of her friends still has a desktop computer ANSEP gave her. The Gustavus-born senior was living in Oregon when she decided to apply to Edgecumbe. And she added, that while an ANSEP boarding school sounds appealing, it would not have been a good match for her.“I don’t have the scores for something that would be fast-tracked. I’m not good at classes that are going to be sped up or anything,” Martinez explained. “So, I’d be concerned about my own education and probably would have stayed in Oregon.”In a press release issued Jan. 30, ANSEP stated that students at its school would earn dozens of credits towards a bachelor’s of engineering, science, psychology or education and graduate college in three years.For Willis, also a senior, her big bone to pick is that ANSEP feeds the University of Alaska only.“I have applied to UAF, just in case, but it’s not my first choice,” she said. “I’d rather go to school out of state.”Willis is from Central, a tiny community near Fairbanks. She considers ANSEP a fantastic program for rural Alaskans like herself. But she was adamant that if ANSEP wants to fix education in the state, they’re better off leaving Edgecumbe alone and putting their energies towards other problems.“There’s other proposals going through legislature to raise the number of minimum students to keep a school open. In the next few years, there’s a really good possibility that there’s going to be schools closing. So there’s going to be that many more kids without schools to attend,” Willis said. “And if they don’t have as many options for other places to go … I can’t predict the future, but that doesn’t seem like a great combination of factors.”Teacher Dionne Brady-Howard worries about this too.Teacher Dionne Brady-Howard. (Photo by Emily Kwong/KCAW)“The fact is that, in going from a four year to a three year program with narrower focus, things will be lost,” she said.If Edgecumbe had a school spirit parade, Brady-Howard would be marching in front with a cardinal and gold baton. She graduated in 1991, has taught social studies since 2000, and sent both her daughters through the school.And Brady-Howard is worried that young Alaskans wouldn’t be ready to sign on to the kind of school ANSEP has in mind by the eighth grade. In their press release, ANSEP claims it will have its graduates career ready by age 20.“There are so many of us who go out in the world and can barely declare a major by the time we’re 20, let alone know that we’re already certified as an engineer or a scientist and be work ready,” Brady-Howard said. “To expect 13-year-olds applying to the ANSEP Mt. Edgecumbe accelerated high school that they’re proposing is a bit daunting.”Months away from graduation, Willis also has the next generation on her mind.Willis said she’s a little heartbroken over the idea of Mt. Edgecumbe closing.“It just feels like everybody, as well as Alaska, would kind of be losing something. It’s 70 years of tradition here. And it’s not just the history, it’s the future. OK, I know kids in seventh and eighth grade who want to come here and there are kids in freshman and sophomore year who want to graduate from here. If that were to go away, it  just seems like it would be tragic.Though very little is on paper, Martinez said that ANSEP has come to represent a bogeyman for Edgecumbe students. And a punchline.“Something breaks, we’ll say, ‘Oh it’s ANSEP’s fault.’ Something happens, ‘Oh it’s ANSEP. This is totally a conspiracy by ANSEP.’ A bunch of running jokes,” Martinez said. “I think that’s how Edgecumbe deals with things. Bad humor for sure.”Bad humor maybe, and a lot of Edgecumbe pride for sure.Share this story:last_img read more

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Ingenuity Mars helicopter to take flight this month

first_imgNASA’s Ingenuity makes history as first helicopter flight on another planet April 20, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS Advertisement AdvertisementThe Perseverance rover, which carried the helicopter to Mars, will watch from 197 feet away on an overlook.“Think of it as a lookout point,” said Farah Alibay, Perseverance integration lead for Ingenuity at JPL. “If you ever go to a national park and you have a beautiful view, you want to park there and look. Our rover is going do that and our beautiful view is going to be Ingenuity, and we are going to do our very best to capture Ingenuity in flight.”Perseverance will attempt to take pictures and video of Ingenuity’s maiden flight. Ingenuity sounds like a small airplane taking off, and Perseverance will try to capture that sound. AdvertisementTags: helicopterMarsPerseverance WATCH LIVE: NASA Mars rover Perseverance lands on red planet February 19, 2021 Advertisement NASA naming rocks & soil on Mars in the Navajo language March 14, 2021 Curiosity rover spots colorful, sparkling clouds on Mars June 2, 2021 Images and data from the helicopter and rover will be sent back to Earth hours and then days later. That makes Perseverance the sole witness to this historic flight in the moment, reported CNN.Ingenuity will conduct its first flight, and up to four others over the course of 31 Earth days, by itself, using a set of instructions sent from pilots at JPL. An onboard computer will use the images taken by the helicopter to track features on the ground and make tiny adjustments 500 times per second to keep the helicopter on its trajectory in case of disturbances like wind gusts. If the first flight is successful, Ingenuity will push itself to fly higher and longer to test the limits of what it can do. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments The first powered, controlled flight on another planet has been years in the making — and it has roots in the first such flight on Earth.It has been 117 years since Orville Wright took flight in Flyer 1 for 12 seconds on a historic December day in 1903 at Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. During the fourth and final flight that day, Wright achieved a nearly 60-second flight, reported CNN.More than a century later, the 4-pound Ingenuity helicopter will use its two pairs of 4-foot blades to reach nearly 20 feet up through the thin atmosphere on Mars, reported CNN. The miniscule helicopter will hover for 30 seconds, capture images, make a turn and return to the ground.“The first flight is special. It’s by far the most important flight that we plan to do,” said Håvard Grip, Ingenuity’s chief pilot at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentslast_img read more

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Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned in garden

first_img Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GAA Facebook Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned in garden Pinterest Previous articleNew Portlaoise ring road set to officially open this FridayNext articleWATCH: Laois teenager stars in stunning Irish rendition of ‘Shallow’ Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest Twitter Home News Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned… News GAA Facebook Portlaoise Gardaí are appealing to the public for their assistance relating to an alleged dangerous driving incident.This is believed to have occurred on Sunday last, October 27, between 9pm and 10pm and involved a red 2008 Audi A4 with yellow plates on the back.The dangerous driving started in Durrow town and continued out the Ballyragget road as far as Ballyragget and back towards Durrow and Attanagh and into Ballyouskill.When in Ballyouskill, the Audi collided with a parked car and was left abandoned in the garden of a private house.The driver then fled the scene.The vehicle has been seized and Gardai are particularly interested in speaking to the few people that driver overtook along the way especially anyone in Ballyragget area that may have witnessed this.Anyone with information can contact 0578674150 and seek to speak to Garda Cooper.SEE ALSO – Facebook page set up to tell spooky Laois stories thriving as Halloween approaches GAA By Alan Hartnett – 30th October 2019 Twitterlast_img read more

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Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18

first_img Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18 Facebook Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months WhatsApp TAGSPortlaoise Institute Previous articleMidlands neurological charities come together to launch joint event for Brain Awareness Week 2021Next articleDeaths in Laois – Sunday, March 7, 2021 LaoisToday Reporter Join in on Portlaoise Institute’s Virtual Open Night on Thursday 18th March 2021 from 7pm onwards. The event will be held on their Facebook page with a mixture of presentations from both staff and students on each course, as well as having the opportunity to engage in live Q and A sessions to help you decide which is the right course for you. Here is the schedule of the night: The links for the live Question and Answer sessions will be posted on the Institute’s Facebook page at both 7.30pm and 8.30pm where students can ask questions on all our courses, fees, the application process and progression options. Applications for September 2021 are now available on the Portlaoise Institute website. There are seventeen full time QQI certified courses available, so there is something for everyone.Portlaoise Institute is committed to providing all students with a high-quality education that enables them to achieve their maximum potential in an engaging, challenging and student-centred environment. It’s a place where students can experiment with new subjects and discover new passions through engagement with numerous different modules. It’s a place where vital knowledge, technical and practical skills are learned so that students are ready for further education or to enter the world of work with an industry recognised qualification. It’s a place brimming with opportunity, where students will be secure in the knowledge that staff are striving to curate the best possible education for them. SEE ALSO – Check out the dedicated jobs section on LaoisToday Facebook Pinterest Home Sponsored Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18 Sponsored Pinterest Council Twitter Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date WhatsApp Electric Picnic Electric Picnic By LaoisToday Reporter – 7th March 2021 Twitterlast_img read more

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‘Best interest’ costs spark industry debate

FCA seeks consumer duty standards Few participants speaking at an Ontario Securities Commision (OSC) industry roundtable on the adoption of a statutory best interest duty disagreed that the majority of advisors were already acting with their clients’ best interests in mind. Instead, the debate focused on whether the formal adoption of such a standard would result in added costs to financial advisory firms. Tuesday’s roundtable in Toronto was organized by the OSC to hear industry views on the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) consultation paper 33-403 released last year. Fiona Collie Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Some participants said they don’t believe that a statutory best interest, or fiduciary, duty will result in added costs because advisors and their firms already hold themselves to a high professional standard, which means they’ve already made the necessary investments in their business. John DeGoey, associate portfolio manager, advisor, Burgeonvest Bick Securities Ltd. argued that any advisor who says they already work in the best interest of clients shouldn’t have additional costs with the adoption of a statutory duty because there will be no change to their operations. “If people are acting as though they are fiduciaries then the services they provide will be identical and the cost of those services will be identical,” said DeGoey. “I cannot see how anyone can say, well, we’re doing this already and it’s going to have a big change in our costs or the services we provide.” Furthermore, Andrew Marsh, CEO, Richardson GMP Ltd., said that the industry as a whole has faced increasing costs for years because clients are looking for more from advisors and their firms. In the past 20 years, advisory firms have had to make large investments in their firms, from computers, to new software and online services, said Marsh, and all because clients expect it. “The demands from our clients and our industry has naturally driven us to a higher professional standard,” he said, “it has naturally increased the cost also to cover [ourselves] because we’ve become so litigious.” However, other roundtable participants argued that whether or not an advisor thought of themselves as fiduciaries, a best interest standard would increase costs for firms because of the necessary compliance. “They might be [following a best interest standard],” said Adrian Walrath, policy counsel, Investment Industry Association of Canada, “but they don’t necessarily have a system to show that they’re doing it.” For example, the formal adoption of a best interest standard could require firms to adopt new documentation, supervisors and training, said Walrath, in order to prove to regulators and the courts that an advisor was acting in the client’s interest. Even without the additional operational costs, the real expense in the adoption of best interest or fiduciary standard of care would come from the courts, argued Laura Paglia, partner with Torys LLP. While most people in the industry at the moment use the terms ‘best interest’ or ‘fiduciary’ to imply acting in good faith or doing the right thing for clients, Paglia said, the courts will have very specific understanding of the meaning of those words, which will lead to an increase in liability for advisors and their firms. “[Fiduciary] means something to judges and to lawyers in disputes, that’s the cost,” said Paglia. “The liabilities that [regulators are] opening up investment professionals to in the way, this will be interpreted by my ilk and my profession on both sides of the fence and those who decide those disputes.” Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Fiduciary duty breach caught by whistleblower Keywords Best interest standard,  Fiduciary dutyCompanies Canadian Securities Administrators, Ontario Securities Commission FINRA to focus on retail investors in its reviews this year read more

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The key to success with CI

first_img Many advisors shy away from the topic of critical illness (CI) when talking to clients about their insurance needs. However, CI insurance can play an important role in a client’s financial plan, and by getting clients to think about the impact an illness could have on their lives, advisors may be surprised to see how much the product appeals to clients. “The people who do sell it, sell a lot of it, because they’re not afraid to talk about it,” says Tim Landry, living benefits consultant with Montreal-based QTR Solutions. Related news Knowing how to talk about CI insurance, Landry says, is key to success in selling these policies. He suspects that advisors who have had trouble generating sales of CI policies might be taking the wrong approach. For instance, using statistics to underscore the likelihood that a client will experience a severe illness often fails to have the intended impact, according to Landry. Although advisors might assume they’ll get clients’ attention by pointing out the odds that they’ll develop cancer, Landry says clients often see that as a scare tactic. “We spend far too much time talking about statistics,” says Landry. “The moment you talk statistics, you’re inviting people to say ‘well, I’ll be one of the three people that don’t get it’.” A more effective way of raising the topic of CI insurance, Landry says, is to ask clients whether they know anyone who has experienced cancer, a heart attack or a stroke, and inquire about the impact it had on that individual’s life. Since a vast majority of adults know someone who has experienced one of these illnesses, that gives them a real-life scenario to which they can relate. Many advisors are deterred by the underwriting process associated with CI insurance. Most insurance companies carefully assess each applicant’s health and family medical history as part of the underwriting process, and declines, ratings and exclusions tend to be common in cases where the risk of an illness is higher. “It is far more difficult to underwrite a critical illness or disability policy than it is to underwrite a life insurance policy,” says Micheline Varas, senior vice president, living benefits and managing partner at Vancouver-based Customplan Financial Advisors Inc. “It makes that process a little bit more tedious to explain to a client.” However, the underwriting process needn’t be a barrier to sales. Advisors who educate themselves on how the underwriting process works will have an easier time identifying potential red flags when filling out an application with clients, so that they can prepare clients for the possibility that the application will come back with a rating, an exclusion or a decline. “I think there has to be an understanding of the underwriting process, what’s required [and] how different illnesses impact underwriting decisions,” says Varas. She suggests going through the entire insurance application with clients, including the medical section, to identify any potential problems. In cases in which advisors are concerned that an application will be declined, clients should consider applying first for a simplified or basic CI policy, which tends to be easier to qualify for than more comprehensive policies. “There are products out there specifically designed for people who are hard to insure for critical illness,” says Landry. Although the price of CI insurance can be a concern for some clients – particularly because premiums have risen considerably in recent years – advisors can customize the product to the client’s budget. For instance, cost-conscious clients could opt for a 10- or 20-year term policy rather than a permanent policy, to keep premiums down. In addition, choosing a lower level of coverage can make the policy more affordable. Although clients might like the idea of having enough coverage to pay off their entire mortgage, it might be more realistic to get a policy that would cover mortgage payments and other living expenses for six months or a year. “Focus on what the immediate need is,” says Varas. “That’s going to alleviate a lot of the financial pressure on this individual when they’re going through such an emotionally and physically difficult time in their life.” Advisors who don’t feel confident enough in their knowledge of CI to actively promote the product should consider a referral arrangement with advisors who specialize in living benefits, Landry suggests. “A lot of people just talk about what they’re comfortable with, and I don’t blame them for that. What they need to do is build an association with other reps who understand it, and work together,” he says. “That way, you can offer your clients everything, and you’ve got a group of people around you who are dealing in a quality manner with all of these products.” This is the second article in a three-part series on critical illness insurance. Up next: The evolution of CI insurance. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The changing face of CI Keywords Critical illness insurance Navigating the underwriting process for CI insurance Facebook LinkedIn Twitter CI: An untapped market Megan Harman last_img read more

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$2 million investment in CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business launches two new undergraduate business programs

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The Anschutz Foundation has committed $2 million to launch two new initiatives designed to make the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado Boulder a more powerful economic contributor to Colorado and beyond.The contribution from The Anschutz Foundation will be divided evenly between two undergraduate programs.The first, a new business minor, will give CU-Boulder students studying in other fields — from arts, to engineering, to humanities, to sciences — a sound overview of business and the market-based economy. Faculty at Leeds designed the program to have a unique, state-of-the-art modular structure unlike other programs of its type. Through the minor, CU-Boulder graduates will be better able to apply business acumen in diverse professional roles, be more attractive to Colorado employers and be better equipped to advance the Colorado economy.The second, a business honors program, will provide an intense academic and professional development experience for the highest caliber students. The goal is for a program so robust in nature that top high school graduates within and beyond the state will choose to pursue an education at Leeds and careers in Colorado. In doing so, the program will heighten the appeal of Leeds to top faculty and researchers, and to select students locally, nationally and internationally — ultimately helping generate and attract new businesses to Colorado and bolstering the region’s economy.“Our programs, with our emphasis on the ‘whole student,’ are aimed at making students exceptionally high performers in their careers,” said David L. Ikenberry, dean of the Leeds School of Business. “The Anschutz Foundation grant toward these two initiatives will indeed propel our school forward, helping us attract the very best talent and give tomorrow’s business leaders tools for great success.”Both programs are connected to a series of key strategic initiatives under way at Leeds aimed at keeping the school at the forefront of economic trends in today’s hypercompetitive business environment. The school’s strengths in business-related research and connections with the Colorado business community provide a great opportunity for impact, Ikenberry said.CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano echoed Ikenberry’s sentiments, highlighting the gift’s implications for the campus and the state.“This vital gift from The Anschutz Foundation helps the Leeds School of Business attract outstanding talent and expand its offerings to CU-Boulder undergraduates in numerous diverse fields. In so doing, Leeds will cultivate tomorrow’s business leaders who will shape the economic future for Colorado and beyond,” DiStefano said.The Leeds commitment is the most recent of numerous significant contributions to support the University of Colorado made by The Anschutz Foundation — the most generous donor in the university’s history — including a transformational series of gifts that led to the establishment of the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.“The Anschutz Foundation has indeed been a strong supporter of the University of Colorado for many years,” said CU President Bruce D. Benson. “This latest commitment not only will support key programs in our Leeds School of Business, but also demonstrates the confidence the leadership of The Anschutz Foundation has in business education at the university.”Contact: Jeremy Simon, University of Colorado Foundation, 303-945-6514 David Ikenberry, Leeds School of Business, 303-492-1809 Published: Sept. 10, 2012 “Our programs, with our emphasis on the ‘whole student,’ are aimed at making students exceptionally high performers in their careers,” said David L. Ikenberry, dean of the Leeds School of Business. “The Anschutz Foundation grant toward these two initiatives will indeed propel our school forward, helping us attract the very best talent and give tomorrow’s business leaders tools for great success.” Categories:AcademicsBusiness & EntrepreneurshipCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

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Pay off parking citations with canned food donations

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 20, 2017 Citation requirementsPlease note citations must have an issuance date prior to April 1, 2017.Also, donations will not be valid for citations in collections, on Bursars bill, relocated/booted vehicles, ADA or fire lane/undesignated space violations or any amount due over $50.Parking Services at University of Colorado Boulder is hosting a community food drive starting Monday, April 24, through Friday, April 28, allowing faculty, staff and students to pay off their campus parking fines with canned food donations instead of cash.The Parking Services event first started in November 2016 and saw great success, with over 202 faculty, staff and students donating food to pay for their CU Boulder parking fines. All food items were given to Boulder’s Harvest of Hope Pantry, providing healthy, supplemental food for families and individuals in need of assistance. Those who are interested in particpating must bring in a minimum of five non-perishable food items to the Parking Services lobby to have an outstanding citation waived.And if you have more than one outstanding citation, feel free to make additional donations! Donations also will be accepted even if you do not have any fines to pay off.For more details, please review the Parking and Transportation Services website.Categories:Getting InvolvedCampus Communitylast_img read more