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Ingenuity Mars helicopter to take flight this month

first_imgNASA’s Ingenuity makes history as first helicopter flight on another planet April 20, 2021 RELATEDTOPICS Advertisement AdvertisementThe Perseverance rover, which carried the helicopter to Mars, will watch from 197 feet away on an overlook.“Think of it as a lookout point,” said Farah Alibay, Perseverance integration lead for Ingenuity at JPL. “If you ever go to a national park and you have a beautiful view, you want to park there and look. Our rover is going do that and our beautiful view is going to be Ingenuity, and we are going to do our very best to capture Ingenuity in flight.”Perseverance will attempt to take pictures and video of Ingenuity’s maiden flight. Ingenuity sounds like a small airplane taking off, and Perseverance will try to capture that sound. AdvertisementTags: helicopterMarsPerseverance WATCH LIVE: NASA Mars rover Perseverance lands on red planet February 19, 2021 Advertisement NASA naming rocks & soil on Mars in the Navajo language March 14, 2021 Curiosity rover spots colorful, sparkling clouds on Mars June 2, 2021 Images and data from the helicopter and rover will be sent back to Earth hours and then days later. That makes Perseverance the sole witness to this historic flight in the moment, reported CNN.Ingenuity will conduct its first flight, and up to four others over the course of 31 Earth days, by itself, using a set of instructions sent from pilots at JPL. An onboard computer will use the images taken by the helicopter to track features on the ground and make tiny adjustments 500 times per second to keep the helicopter on its trajectory in case of disturbances like wind gusts. If the first flight is successful, Ingenuity will push itself to fly higher and longer to test the limits of what it can do. AdvertisementRecommended ArticlesBrie Larson Reportedly Replacing Robert Downey Jr. As The Face Of The MCURead more81 commentsGal Gadot Reportedly Being Recast As Wonder Woman For The FlashRead more29 comments The first powered, controlled flight on another planet has been years in the making — and it has roots in the first such flight on Earth.It has been 117 years since Orville Wright took flight in Flyer 1 for 12 seconds on a historic December day in 1903 at Kill Devil Hills near Kitty Hawk, North Carolina. During the fourth and final flight that day, Wright achieved a nearly 60-second flight, reported CNN.More than a century later, the 4-pound Ingenuity helicopter will use its two pairs of 4-foot blades to reach nearly 20 feet up through the thin atmosphere on Mars, reported CNN. The miniscule helicopter will hover for 30 seconds, capture images, make a turn and return to the ground.“The first flight is special. It’s by far the most important flight that we plan to do,” said Håvard Grip, Ingenuity’s chief pilot at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California. AdvertisementDC Young Fly knocks out heckler (video) – Rolling OutRead more6 comments’Mortal Kombat’ Exceeded Expectations Says WarnerMedia ExecutiveRead more2 commentsDo You Remember Bob’s Big Boy?Read more1 commentsKISS Front Man Paul Stanley Reveals This Is The End Of KISS As A Touring Band, For RealRead more1 commentslast_img read more

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Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned in garden

first_img Here are all of Wednesday’s Laois GAA results RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR GAA Facebook Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned in garden Pinterest Previous articleNew Portlaoise ring road set to officially open this FridayNext articleWATCH: Laois teenager stars in stunning Irish rendition of ‘Shallow’ Alan HartnettStradbally native Alan Hartnett is a graduate of Knockbeg College who has worked in the local and national media since 2008. Alan has a BA in Economics, Politics and Law and an MA in Journalism from DCU. His happiest moment was when Jody Dillon scored THAT goal in the Laois senior football final in 2016. 2020 U-15 ‘B’ glory for Ballyroan-Abbey following six point win over Killeshin Kelly and Farrell lead the way as St Joseph’s claim 2020 U-15 glory WhatsApp WhatsAppcenter_img Pinterest Twitter Home News Gardai appealing for information after car hits parked vehicle and left abandoned… News GAA Facebook Portlaoise Gardaí are appealing to the public for their assistance relating to an alleged dangerous driving incident.This is believed to have occurred on Sunday last, October 27, between 9pm and 10pm and involved a red 2008 Audi A4 with yellow plates on the back.The dangerous driving started in Durrow town and continued out the Ballyragget road as far as Ballyragget and back towards Durrow and Attanagh and into Ballyouskill.When in Ballyouskill, the Audi collided with a parked car and was left abandoned in the garden of a private house.The driver then fled the scene.The vehicle has been seized and Gardai are particularly interested in speaking to the few people that driver overtook along the way especially anyone in Ballyragget area that may have witnessed this.Anyone with information can contact 0578674150 and seek to speak to Garda Cooper.SEE ALSO – Facebook page set up to tell spooky Laois stories thriving as Halloween approaches GAA By Alan Hartnett – 30th October 2019 Twitterlast_img read more

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Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18

first_img Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18 Facebook Mary Sweeney elected Cathaoirleach of Portlaoise Municipal District for next 12 months WhatsApp TAGSPortlaoise Institute Previous articleMidlands neurological charities come together to launch joint event for Brain Awareness Week 2021Next articleDeaths in Laois – Sunday, March 7, 2021 LaoisToday Reporter Join in on Portlaoise Institute’s Virtual Open Night on Thursday 18th March 2021 from 7pm onwards. The event will be held on their Facebook page with a mixture of presentations from both staff and students on each course, as well as having the opportunity to engage in live Q and A sessions to help you decide which is the right course for you. Here is the schedule of the night: The links for the live Question and Answer sessions will be posted on the Institute’s Facebook page at both 7.30pm and 8.30pm where students can ask questions on all our courses, fees, the application process and progression options. Applications for September 2021 are now available on the Portlaoise Institute website. There are seventeen full time QQI certified courses available, so there is something for everyone.Portlaoise Institute is committed to providing all students with a high-quality education that enables them to achieve their maximum potential in an engaging, challenging and student-centred environment. It’s a place where students can experiment with new subjects and discover new passions through engagement with numerous different modules. It’s a place where vital knowledge, technical and practical skills are learned so that students are ready for further education or to enter the world of work with an industry recognised qualification. It’s a place brimming with opportunity, where students will be secure in the knowledge that staff are striving to curate the best possible education for them. SEE ALSO – Check out the dedicated jobs section on LaoisToday Facebook Pinterest Home Sponsored Portlaoise Institute holding virtual Open Night this Thursday, March 18 Sponsored Pinterest Council Twitter Electric Picnic apply to Laois County Council for new date for this year’s festival RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Electric Picnic organisers release statement following confirmation of new festival date WhatsApp Electric Picnic Electric Picnic By LaoisToday Reporter – 7th March 2021 Twitterlast_img read more

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‘Best interest’ costs spark industry debate

FCA seeks consumer duty standards Few participants speaking at an Ontario Securities Commision (OSC) industry roundtable on the adoption of a statutory best interest duty disagreed that the majority of advisors were already acting with their clients’ best interests in mind. Instead, the debate focused on whether the formal adoption of such a standard would result in added costs to financial advisory firms. Tuesday’s roundtable in Toronto was organized by the OSC to hear industry views on the Canadian Securities Administrators (CSA) consultation paper 33-403 released last year. Fiona Collie Share this article and your comments with peers on social media Related news Some participants said they don’t believe that a statutory best interest, or fiduciary, duty will result in added costs because advisors and their firms already hold themselves to a high professional standard, which means they’ve already made the necessary investments in their business. John DeGoey, associate portfolio manager, advisor, Burgeonvest Bick Securities Ltd. argued that any advisor who says they already work in the best interest of clients shouldn’t have additional costs with the adoption of a statutory duty because there will be no change to their operations. “If people are acting as though they are fiduciaries then the services they provide will be identical and the cost of those services will be identical,” said DeGoey. “I cannot see how anyone can say, well, we’re doing this already and it’s going to have a big change in our costs or the services we provide.” Furthermore, Andrew Marsh, CEO, Richardson GMP Ltd., said that the industry as a whole has faced increasing costs for years because clients are looking for more from advisors and their firms. In the past 20 years, advisory firms have had to make large investments in their firms, from computers, to new software and online services, said Marsh, and all because clients expect it. “The demands from our clients and our industry has naturally driven us to a higher professional standard,” he said, “it has naturally increased the cost also to cover [ourselves] because we’ve become so litigious.” However, other roundtable participants argued that whether or not an advisor thought of themselves as fiduciaries, a best interest standard would increase costs for firms because of the necessary compliance. “They might be [following a best interest standard],” said Adrian Walrath, policy counsel, Investment Industry Association of Canada, “but they don’t necessarily have a system to show that they’re doing it.” For example, the formal adoption of a best interest standard could require firms to adopt new documentation, supervisors and training, said Walrath, in order to prove to regulators and the courts that an advisor was acting in the client’s interest. Even without the additional operational costs, the real expense in the adoption of best interest or fiduciary standard of care would come from the courts, argued Laura Paglia, partner with Torys LLP. While most people in the industry at the moment use the terms ‘best interest’ or ‘fiduciary’ to imply acting in good faith or doing the right thing for clients, Paglia said, the courts will have very specific understanding of the meaning of those words, which will lead to an increase in liability for advisors and their firms. “[Fiduciary] means something to judges and to lawyers in disputes, that’s the cost,” said Paglia. “The liabilities that [regulators are] opening up investment professionals to in the way, this will be interpreted by my ilk and my profession on both sides of the fence and those who decide those disputes.” Facebook LinkedIn Twitter Fiduciary duty breach caught by whistleblower Keywords Best interest standard,  Fiduciary dutyCompanies Canadian Securities Administrators, Ontario Securities Commission FINRA to focus on retail investors in its reviews this year read more

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The key to success with CI

first_img Many advisors shy away from the topic of critical illness (CI) when talking to clients about their insurance needs. However, CI insurance can play an important role in a client’s financial plan, and by getting clients to think about the impact an illness could have on their lives, advisors may be surprised to see how much the product appeals to clients. “The people who do sell it, sell a lot of it, because they’re not afraid to talk about it,” says Tim Landry, living benefits consultant with Montreal-based QTR Solutions. Related news Knowing how to talk about CI insurance, Landry says, is key to success in selling these policies. He suspects that advisors who have had trouble generating sales of CI policies might be taking the wrong approach. For instance, using statistics to underscore the likelihood that a client will experience a severe illness often fails to have the intended impact, according to Landry. Although advisors might assume they’ll get clients’ attention by pointing out the odds that they’ll develop cancer, Landry says clients often see that as a scare tactic. “We spend far too much time talking about statistics,” says Landry. “The moment you talk statistics, you’re inviting people to say ‘well, I’ll be one of the three people that don’t get it’.” A more effective way of raising the topic of CI insurance, Landry says, is to ask clients whether they know anyone who has experienced cancer, a heart attack or a stroke, and inquire about the impact it had on that individual’s life. Since a vast majority of adults know someone who has experienced one of these illnesses, that gives them a real-life scenario to which they can relate. Many advisors are deterred by the underwriting process associated with CI insurance. Most insurance companies carefully assess each applicant’s health and family medical history as part of the underwriting process, and declines, ratings and exclusions tend to be common in cases where the risk of an illness is higher. “It is far more difficult to underwrite a critical illness or disability policy than it is to underwrite a life insurance policy,” says Micheline Varas, senior vice president, living benefits and managing partner at Vancouver-based Customplan Financial Advisors Inc. “It makes that process a little bit more tedious to explain to a client.” However, the underwriting process needn’t be a barrier to sales. Advisors who educate themselves on how the underwriting process works will have an easier time identifying potential red flags when filling out an application with clients, so that they can prepare clients for the possibility that the application will come back with a rating, an exclusion or a decline. “I think there has to be an understanding of the underwriting process, what’s required [and] how different illnesses impact underwriting decisions,” says Varas. She suggests going through the entire insurance application with clients, including the medical section, to identify any potential problems. In cases in which advisors are concerned that an application will be declined, clients should consider applying first for a simplified or basic CI policy, which tends to be easier to qualify for than more comprehensive policies. “There are products out there specifically designed for people who are hard to insure for critical illness,” says Landry. Although the price of CI insurance can be a concern for some clients – particularly because premiums have risen considerably in recent years – advisors can customize the product to the client’s budget. For instance, cost-conscious clients could opt for a 10- or 20-year term policy rather than a permanent policy, to keep premiums down. In addition, choosing a lower level of coverage can make the policy more affordable. Although clients might like the idea of having enough coverage to pay off their entire mortgage, it might be more realistic to get a policy that would cover mortgage payments and other living expenses for six months or a year. “Focus on what the immediate need is,” says Varas. “That’s going to alleviate a lot of the financial pressure on this individual when they’re going through such an emotionally and physically difficult time in their life.” Advisors who don’t feel confident enough in their knowledge of CI to actively promote the product should consider a referral arrangement with advisors who specialize in living benefits, Landry suggests. “A lot of people just talk about what they’re comfortable with, and I don’t blame them for that. What they need to do is build an association with other reps who understand it, and work together,” he says. “That way, you can offer your clients everything, and you’ve got a group of people around you who are dealing in a quality manner with all of these products.” This is the second article in a three-part series on critical illness insurance. Up next: The evolution of CI insurance. Share this article and your comments with peers on social media The changing face of CI Keywords Critical illness insurance Navigating the underwriting process for CI insurance Facebook LinkedIn Twitter CI: An untapped market Megan Harman last_img read more

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$2 million investment in CU-Boulder’s Leeds School of Business launches two new undergraduate business programs

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail The Anschutz Foundation has committed $2 million to launch two new initiatives designed to make the Leeds School of Business at the University of Colorado Boulder a more powerful economic contributor to Colorado and beyond.The contribution from The Anschutz Foundation will be divided evenly between two undergraduate programs.The first, a new business minor, will give CU-Boulder students studying in other fields — from arts, to engineering, to humanities, to sciences — a sound overview of business and the market-based economy. Faculty at Leeds designed the program to have a unique, state-of-the-art modular structure unlike other programs of its type. Through the minor, CU-Boulder graduates will be better able to apply business acumen in diverse professional roles, be more attractive to Colorado employers and be better equipped to advance the Colorado economy.The second, a business honors program, will provide an intense academic and professional development experience for the highest caliber students. The goal is for a program so robust in nature that top high school graduates within and beyond the state will choose to pursue an education at Leeds and careers in Colorado. In doing so, the program will heighten the appeal of Leeds to top faculty and researchers, and to select students locally, nationally and internationally — ultimately helping generate and attract new businesses to Colorado and bolstering the region’s economy.“Our programs, with our emphasis on the ‘whole student,’ are aimed at making students exceptionally high performers in their careers,” said David L. Ikenberry, dean of the Leeds School of Business. “The Anschutz Foundation grant toward these two initiatives will indeed propel our school forward, helping us attract the very best talent and give tomorrow’s business leaders tools for great success.”Both programs are connected to a series of key strategic initiatives under way at Leeds aimed at keeping the school at the forefront of economic trends in today’s hypercompetitive business environment. The school’s strengths in business-related research and connections with the Colorado business community provide a great opportunity for impact, Ikenberry said.CU-Boulder Chancellor Philip P. DiStefano echoed Ikenberry’s sentiments, highlighting the gift’s implications for the campus and the state.“This vital gift from The Anschutz Foundation helps the Leeds School of Business attract outstanding talent and expand its offerings to CU-Boulder undergraduates in numerous diverse fields. In so doing, Leeds will cultivate tomorrow’s business leaders who will shape the economic future for Colorado and beyond,” DiStefano said.The Leeds commitment is the most recent of numerous significant contributions to support the University of Colorado made by The Anschutz Foundation — the most generous donor in the university’s history — including a transformational series of gifts that led to the establishment of the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.“The Anschutz Foundation has indeed been a strong supporter of the University of Colorado for many years,” said CU President Bruce D. Benson. “This latest commitment not only will support key programs in our Leeds School of Business, but also demonstrates the confidence the leadership of The Anschutz Foundation has in business education at the university.”Contact: Jeremy Simon, University of Colorado Foundation, 303-945-6514 David Ikenberry, Leeds School of Business, 303-492-1809 Published: Sept. 10, 2012 “Our programs, with our emphasis on the ‘whole student,’ are aimed at making students exceptionally high performers in their careers,” said David L. Ikenberry, dean of the Leeds School of Business. “The Anschutz Foundation grant toward these two initiatives will indeed propel our school forward, helping us attract the very best talent and give tomorrow’s business leaders tools for great success.” Categories:AcademicsBusiness & EntrepreneurshipCampus CommunityNews Headlineslast_img read more

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Pay off parking citations with canned food donations

first_imgShare Share via TwitterShare via FacebookShare via LinkedInShare via E-mail Published: April 20, 2017 Citation requirementsPlease note citations must have an issuance date prior to April 1, 2017.Also, donations will not be valid for citations in collections, on Bursars bill, relocated/booted vehicles, ADA or fire lane/undesignated space violations or any amount due over $50.Parking Services at University of Colorado Boulder is hosting a community food drive starting Monday, April 24, through Friday, April 28, allowing faculty, staff and students to pay off their campus parking fines with canned food donations instead of cash.The Parking Services event first started in November 2016 and saw great success, with over 202 faculty, staff and students donating food to pay for their CU Boulder parking fines. All food items were given to Boulder’s Harvest of Hope Pantry, providing healthy, supplemental food for families and individuals in need of assistance. Those who are interested in particpating must bring in a minimum of five non-perishable food items to the Parking Services lobby to have an outstanding citation waived.And if you have more than one outstanding citation, feel free to make additional donations! Donations also will be accepted even if you do not have any fines to pay off.For more details, please review the Parking and Transportation Services website.Categories:Getting InvolvedCampus Communitylast_img read more

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PayPal changes its mind on NFC

first_img PayPal backs Tink to boost customer experience AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInLinkedInShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to MoreAddThisMore 22 FEB 2016 PayPal will announce a shift in its NFC stance this morning with two initiatives – an upgrade to its app that will support the technology and an alliance with Vodafone Group for contactless payments.Customers in the US and Australia will be able to make NFC-based payments using the PayPal app on their smartphones, starting in the second quarter.In addition, the payments giant has joined forces with Vodafone so the operator’s mobile wallet users in a number of European countries can make NFC-enabled payments.The service is initially available in Spain, starting this week. Other European markets will follow later in 2016.PayPal’s announcement is an acknowledgement that NFC has gained some traction over the last 18 months. The technology has gathered a number of high profile supporters, including Apple, Samsung and Google.The previous stance of the payments firm and its former eBay parent was very different. eBay CEO John Donahoe famously described NFC as standing for “Not For Commerce”.And former PayPal president David Marcus (now at Facebook) expressed scepticism about the technology on several occasions.PayPal was spun off from eBay last summer, leaving it freer to make its own strategic choices. Beyond its core online payments business, PayPal has a presence in peer-to-peer (Venmo), remittances (Xoom) and in-app payments (Braintree).Adopting NFC fills a gap in this line-up, which is in-store payments.In trying to match rivals such as Visa and MasterCard, PayPal must be available to users in locations such as shops and restaurants.Separately, the payments firm will put some meat on the bones of a previously announced partnership with America Movil. Unlike the Vodafone announcement, this does not cover NFC.Telcel in Mexico and Brazil’s Claro, both America Movil subsidiaries, will add PayPal capability to their mobile wallets. The update will come in Spring, initially for users to top up their prepaid accounts using PayPal.Finally, PayPal-owned Xoom has struck an agreement which will enable its users to send remittances direct to the accounts of M-Pesa users in Kenya, the most well know mobile money service in the world, which is operated by Safaricom. Money Previous ArticleMobile Connect availability hits 2BNext ArticleTeliaSonera taps Huawei’s 4.5G to drive unknown use cases Richard is the editor of Mobile World Live’s money channel and a contributor to the daily news service. He is an experienced technology and business journalist who previously worked as a freelancer for many publications over the last decade including… Read more Paypal PayPal chief eyes Venmo expansioncenter_img Related Author Tags HomeMoneyNews PayPal changes its mind on NFC UK green lights completed PayPal, iZettle deal Richard Handford last_img read more

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Walker leads at Texas Open; Spieth two back

first_imgSAN ANTONIO – Jimmy Walker enjoyed a neighborly stroll at TPC San Antonio after a 35-minute drive from his suburban home. Walker shot a 5-under 67 on Friday in the Texas Open to take a one-stroke lead in his hometown event. He won the Sony Open in Hawaii in January after winning three times last season. ”It’s nice to have friends and family here,” Walker said. ”Good vibes and good mojo, and I believe in all that stuff. Positive energy is good.” Walker overtook first-round leader Charley Hoffman with three straight birdies late in his round. Hoffman, 8 under at the turn, uncharacteristically let a good round get away on the Oaks Course with three bogeys on his second nine. He finished with a 72 to drop into a tie for second with Aaron Baddeley. Hoffman has two top-three finishes in his previous four appearances at the Texas Open. Baddeley had a 71. ”I’ll keep drawing on my experience here, and I think you can get this golf course,” said Hoffman, who led by two entering the day. Valero Texas Open: Articles, videos and photos Kevin Na, who infamously took 16 strokes on a par 4 in the event four years ago, had a 68 to join Texan Jordan Spieth at 4 under. The 21-year Spieth, coming off a playoff victory two weeks ago at Innisbrook, followed his opening 71 with a 69. The gusts near 40 mph that blew Thursday morning continued to subside, though play started Friday with temperatures in the 40s. ”But it wasn’t windy, so that was nice,” Walker said. The improved conditions packed the leaderboard with nine players within four strokes of Walker. That included Phil Mickelson, continuing to cram for the Masters less than two weeks off, at 2 under after a second-round 72. He was tied for sixth. ”It was a good first two days,” said Mickelson, who has a best finish this season of 17th at the Honda Classic. ”I putted well and hit some good iron shots, but I’ll have to work on the driving tomorrow. I played Augusta a few days before I came here and I was driving it great. I haven’t hit it the way I felt I have been hitting it.” FedEx Cup champion Billy Horschel (70), Zach Johnson (71), Chris Kirk (71) and 2011 winner Brendan Steele (68) also were 2 under. Johnson felt a jarring sensation in his right ring finger when he hit a rock while swinging from the native area to the right of the 12th fairway. He continued and expects to play this weekend. Francisco Molinari, the former European Ryder Cup player, withdrew before the round because of a wrist injury he said happened while shooting 81 in the wind Thursday. Jim Furyk and Dustin Johnson managed to survive for the weekend as the cut dropped a stroke in the afternoon to 6 over. Both made it on the number, and Furyk kept a streak of consecutive cuts made, now at 33. Steve Stricker, not playing this week, has the best active streak at 35. Martin Kaymer wasn’t close. After shooting his PGA Tour-worst 82 on Thursday, he had an 80 on Friday. The U.S. Open champion told officials in Houston he has changed his plans not to play next week and has committed to the Shell Houston Open to get ready for the Masters. Marc Warren and Harris English made the cut in their bids to earn Masters spots by getting into the top 50 in the world. Warren is No. 52, and his 4-over total had him three shots out of a top-20 finish that could push him to Augusta. English, 53rd, needs something in the top 10, and he was five shots from that at 3 over. Walker jumped to the lead with a hot putter. Combining his three birdies from his 15th, 16th and 17th holes, Walker made almost 40 feet worth of putts. ”I didn’t make anything, then finally got one to go,” Walker said. ”That was a nice way to finish.” Mickelson got it to 4 under after hitting to 3 feet on the 174-yard third hole – his 12th of the day – and chipping in on No. 4. But he had a double bogey two holes later with a tee shot that put him thick in the trees to the left on the par 4, followed by a shot out of the woods across the fairway. He was still 54 yards away, and he left that approach short of the green and couldn’t get up-and-down to save bogey.last_img read more

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Montanans to Treaty Negotiators: ‘Lincoln County Needs to Get a Piece of the Pie’

first_imgWhen the Libby Dam was completed in the 1970s and the Kootenai River Valley was flooded behind it, some of John Doble’s family’s ranch land was submerged underneath what is now known as Lake Koocanusa.Doble said his family was still able to work the land that remained and operate their Christmas tree farm — it was the creation of the artificial Christmas tree that really sunk that business — but years later it’s plainly obvious to Doble and others like him that they lost much more than land. They lost communities.With the creation of the reservoir, thousands of acres of taxable land were taken away, as was the largest local taxpayer in that part of Lincoln County, the Great Northern Railway, which rerouted its main line to the south. Within a few years, the small school districts that once populated the area north of Rexford had to consolidate, and today most students go to school in Eureka.The same story can be told north of the border, where three other dams created by an international water compact called the Columbia River Treaty also flooded and displaced communities. But unlike Lincoln County, those communities got a check.Doble and about 200 other people, many from Lincoln County, attended a March 20 Kalispell town hall with the federal officials who are currently working with their counterparts in Canada to modernize the 55-year-old treaty. While stakeholders from all across the Columbia River Basin came to share their thoughts about the future of the treaty, the thoughts of Lincoln County were best summed up by one Eureka man: “Lincoln County needs to get a piece of the pie.”The Columbia River Treaty and the four dams it created were a response to the devastating floods that annually ravaged the Pacific Northwest, most notably the 1948 flood in Vanport, Oregon that killed more than 30 people. As an added benefit to flood control, the dams also created a massive amount of electricity. The treaty has no expiration date, but either country can cancel it or suggest changes beginning in 2024, as long as they give a 10-year notice. Since 2013, U.S. and Canadian negotiators have met five times looking for common ground to modernize the treaty.One of the American team’s top priorities is to change how Canada is paid for water storage. The 1964 treaty called for a one-time payment equal to half of the downstream power generated in the United States for 30 years. That payment of $254 million worth of electricity helped Canada build its three treaty dams. That part of the agreement expired in 2003, and since then the United States has delivered a daily allotment of power to Canada, worth $222 million to $359 million annually, known as the Canadian Entitlement. American officials believe that is too steep of a price to pay moving forward.Jill Smail, chief treaty negotiator for the U.S. Department of State, said during the March 20 meeting that she couldn’t go into specifics about what has been discussed with Canada but that progress was being made.“Our conversations have been frank and productive,” she said.Town hall meetings have taken place across the basin during the course of negotiations to gather input on how the American side should move forward. American officials have said their primary objectives are to maintain effective flood control operations, improve benefits to the ecosystem and make sure that power generation payments are fair to both sides of the border.During the meeting, more than two-dozen people stood up to share their thoughts. A number of stakeholders from Oregon, including a representative of Gov. Kate Brown’s office, spoke about the importance of maintaining assured flood control in the basin. Currently, Canada promises to hold water back to make sure water flow is consistent and impacts from high runoff are minimal. But in 2024, the assured flood control provision expires and reverts to “called-upon” flood control. In order for the United States to request that Canada holds back more water, flows would have to exceed target levels at the Dalles Dam in the Columbia River Gorge. Oregon officials worry called-upon flood control could result in higher water on the lower Columbia River and damage levees in Portland.The shipping community, specifically barge operators on the Columbia River, also worry that inconsistent water flows through the gorge could negatively impact their industry. A representative of the Montana Grain Growers Association said dramatic changes to shipping in the Columbia River Gorge would negatively impact their members as well.For Montana residents, though, the biggest concern raised during the meeting was making sure Lincoln County was compensated for the land it lost under Lake Koocanusa. During the meeting, state Republican Sen. Mike Cuffe — a leading advocate for changing the Canadian Entitlement and the man many credit for convincing federal officials to have a meeting in Montana — handed the negotiators copies of a joint House and Senate resolution that calls on federal officials to negotiate some sort of compensation for Lincoln County for holding water. The measure won near-unanimous support in both chambers.“Montana should receive benefits that it was denied during the first round of treaty negotiations,” said Rep. Steve Gunderson, who represents House District 1 in Lincoln County.Others, including Sen. Bruce Gillespie, a Republican who represents Senate District 9, suggested that money Montana received from the Columbia River Treaty could go toward fighting aquatic invasive species.“If you protect Montana, you protect the entire Pacific Northwest,” he said.But most people from Lincoln County said any money received as the result of a renegotiated Columbia River Treaty should go to the communities impacted most by the creation of Lake Koocanusa. An official from the Eureka School District said he could find numerous ways to spend money in his school district, especially after the failure of a number of recent school levies.Dovle, whose family lost ranch land to the lake back in the 1970s, said he knows money from the Columbia River Treaty wouldn’t solve all of Lincoln County’s problems, but it would certainly help.“We got a pretty crappy end of the stick in Lincoln County, to put it bluntly,” he said after the meeting. Email Stay Connected with the Daily Roundup. 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